Abstract

Tolerance to law violations (TLV) was measured in 60 male and female university students. In addition to this measure, engagement in social projection was assessed in 148 female students. Past researchers have found that people tend to project their attitudes on others, but less so on perceived “outgroups’. TLV and social projection were measured using a questionnaire comprising of 10 TLV statements, each followed by an estimation question that measured the participants’ engagement in social projection. Based on the gender differences in criminal behaviour, the masculation of criminality, and the male offender stereotype it is predicted that male students will have a greater tolerance for law violations than female students. Based on past research on in-group social projection, we hypothesize that female students will exhibit increased social projection when the target is described as sharing the same gender as the participant. Furthermore, similar to findings in a study conducted by Webster and Vermeulen (2011), we predict that if the target shares the same offender status as the participant (i.e. non- offender status) there will be greater social projection of TLV attitudes.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Sandra Vermeulen

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Tolerance for Law Violations and Social Projection

Tolerance to law violations (TLV) was measured in 60 male and female university students. In addition to this measure, engagement in social projection was assessed in 148 female students. Past researchers have found that people tend to project their attitudes on others, but less so on perceived “outgroups’. TLV and social projection were measured using a questionnaire comprising of 10 TLV statements, each followed by an estimation question that measured the participants’ engagement in social projection. Based on the gender differences in criminal behaviour, the masculation of criminality, and the male offender stereotype it is predicted that male students will have a greater tolerance for law violations than female students. Based on past research on in-group social projection, we hypothesize that female students will exhibit increased social projection when the target is described as sharing the same gender as the participant. Furthermore, similar to findings in a study conducted by Webster and Vermeulen (2011), we predict that if the target shares the same offender status as the participant (i.e. non- offender status) there will be greater social projection of TLV attitudes.

 

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