Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine if site preparing a cut block using a winged subsoiler to deep rip the soil would impact the site index or growth of the site. This study was conducted South of 100 Mile House in the dry, cool interior Douglas-fir subzone, IDFdk3/01. Three blocks were sampled, each with 30 plots where the lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) tree with the largest diameter at 1.3m was cut down and age and height were measured. The site index values determined using the growth intercept method were then compared to values recorded in 2006 and SIBEC, a program designed to estimate site index based on site series in British Columbia. Volume growth per year was measured based on annual ring width and compared between blocks. Site index was found in all three blocks to be greater than recorded in 2006, but less than predicted by SIBEC. Block C was notably lower than blocks A and B. Growth per year varied between blocks, block A increased and flattened off, Block B cycled over the years, and Block C increased steadily. Site index is a valuable measurement that can aid in determining growth and yield, funding allocation, and annual allowable cut. More research needs to be done through the different ecological zones where site preparation is commonly used to determine what impacts it has on the growth of the seedlings.

Department

Natural Resource Science

Faculty Advisor

John Karakatsoulis

Share

COinS
 

Affects of Deep Ripping on Site Index Near 100 Mile House, British Columbia

The objective of this study was to determine if site preparing a cut block using a winged subsoiler to deep rip the soil would impact the site index or growth of the site. This study was conducted South of 100 Mile House in the dry, cool interior Douglas-fir subzone, IDFdk3/01. Three blocks were sampled, each with 30 plots where the lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) tree with the largest diameter at 1.3m was cut down and age and height were measured. The site index values determined using the growth intercept method were then compared to values recorded in 2006 and SIBEC, a program designed to estimate site index based on site series in British Columbia. Volume growth per year was measured based on annual ring width and compared between blocks. Site index was found in all three blocks to be greater than recorded in 2006, but less than predicted by SIBEC. Block C was notably lower than blocks A and B. Growth per year varied between blocks, block A increased and flattened off, Block B cycled over the years, and Block C increased steadily. Site index is a valuable measurement that can aid in determining growth and yield, funding allocation, and annual allowable cut. More research needs to be done through the different ecological zones where site preparation is commonly used to determine what impacts it has on the growth of the seedlings.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.