Abstract

This research project was conducted in affiliation with Thompson Rivers University (TRU) and the Kamloops and District Elizabeth Fry Society, as a part of the TRU community development research grant. The goal was to gain more in-depth insight into how recovery houses and resource hubs could help women who have been criminalized.

To begin, a literature review was conducted on women experiencing criminalization and their needs and concerns. Through this review, five main themes emerged. These were the overrepresentation of Indigenous women, the fragmentation of their healthcare experiences, the need to renegotiate their relationships, the challenges of community reintegration, and additional barriers such as employment and housing. Consideration is given to two subsets of this population, older women and transgender women. Consideration is also given to the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has on women who have been criminalized.

Second, a literature review was conducted regarding recovery houses and the benefits and challenges associated with them.

Third, a literature review was conducted on the existence of resource hubs. Due to their limited nature, this review was expanded internationally.

The information acquired in these three sections was then compiled into a list of recommendations that mirror the five main themes of concern for women experiencing criminalization. The vision of the recovery house and the resource hub is to work collaboratively to address these five areas of a woman’s life, to provide holistic care, and to ensure no woman falls through the gap.

The full Community Report summarized in this poster can be viewed at https://tru.arcabc.ca/islandora/object/tru%3A5406

Department

Social Work

Faculty Advisor

Juliana West and Jennifer Murphy

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Breaking the Cycle: The Implications of a Recovery House and Resource Hub for Women Experiencing Criminalization.

This research project was conducted in affiliation with Thompson Rivers University (TRU) and the Kamloops and District Elizabeth Fry Society, as a part of the TRU community development research grant. The goal was to gain more in-depth insight into how recovery houses and resource hubs could help women who have been criminalized.

To begin, a literature review was conducted on women experiencing criminalization and their needs and concerns. Through this review, five main themes emerged. These were the overrepresentation of Indigenous women, the fragmentation of their healthcare experiences, the need to renegotiate their relationships, the challenges of community reintegration, and additional barriers such as employment and housing. Consideration is given to two subsets of this population, older women and transgender women. Consideration is also given to the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has on women who have been criminalized.

Second, a literature review was conducted regarding recovery houses and the benefits and challenges associated with them.

Third, a literature review was conducted on the existence of resource hubs. Due to their limited nature, this review was expanded internationally.

The information acquired in these three sections was then compiled into a list of recommendations that mirror the five main themes of concern for women experiencing criminalization. The vision of the recovery house and the resource hub is to work collaboratively to address these five areas of a woman’s life, to provide holistic care, and to ensure no woman falls through the gap.

The full Community Report summarized in this poster can be viewed at https://tru.arcabc.ca/islandora/object/tru%3A5406

 

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