The Post-harvest Effects on the Growth of Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) on the Perimeter of Harvested Strips

Gillian C. Spencer, Thompson Rivers University

Abstract

Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) was harvested by Tolko on a site near Kelowna, located in the Montane Spruce biogeoclimatic zone, in 2018 using a strip-selection method leaving tree reserves. Previously, the area was harvested in 1975 and planted with Lodgepole pine. Each block consists of strips that are 10, 15, and 20 m widths, and all varying lengths. Two blocks were used in this project, one with strips laid out North to South and one with strips laid out East to West. This research determines if growth of trees on the edges have been stimulated by the canopy opening, and whether varying strip widths and orientations have an effect. Growth was determined by measuring diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height for volume and by measuring annual growth using tree cores. These measurements will be compared to measurements taken pre-harvest in January 2017. Given the relatively increased light availability in trees that are South-facing and in 20 m strips, it was predicted that those trees will have the most growth since harvest. The results of this study could alter silviculture plans made by foresters to include trees on the edge of openings and potentially increase their harvest volume.

 
Mar 31st, 1:19 PM Mar 31st, 1:25 PM

The Post-harvest Effects on the Growth of Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) on the Perimeter of Harvested Strips

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Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) was harvested by Tolko on a site near Kelowna, located in the Montane Spruce biogeoclimatic zone, in 2018 using a strip-selection method leaving tree reserves. Previously, the area was harvested in 1975 and planted with Lodgepole pine. Each block consists of strips that are 10, 15, and 20 m widths, and all varying lengths. Two blocks were used in this project, one with strips laid out North to South and one with strips laid out East to West. This research determines if growth of trees on the edges have been stimulated by the canopy opening, and whether varying strip widths and orientations have an effect. Growth was determined by measuring diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height for volume and by measuring annual growth using tree cores. These measurements will be compared to measurements taken pre-harvest in January 2017. Given the relatively increased light availability in trees that are South-facing and in 20 m strips, it was predicted that those trees will have the most growth since harvest. The results of this study could alter silviculture plans made by foresters to include trees on the edge of openings and potentially increase their harvest volume.