Presentation Title

Sensitive Detection of Parts-Per-Billion Levels of Nisin in Dairy Products by Capillary Electrophoresis

Start Date

30-3-2021 9:56 AM

End Date

30-3-2021 10:02 AM

Abstract

Nisin is a polycyclic antimicrobial peptide produced by the gram-positive bacteria, Lactococcus lactis. Due to its antimicrobial properties and low toxicity, nisin is commonly used in the food industry as a preservative in alcoholic beverages and foods such as meat and dairy. Nisin is currently the only lantibiotic that is FDA-approved for use as a biopreservative, however, changes in temperature, pH or interactions with other ingredients can cause nisin’s activity to degrade overtime. For this reason, it is crucial to be able to quantify and monitor the stability of nisin throughout a product’s shelf life. In this project, a technique called micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) will be employed to separate and quantify nisin in dairy products. An additional technique called large volume sample stacking technique (LVSS) will be investigated in order to improve the sensitivity of the method. The method will be optimized by testing parameters such as sample solvent composition, buffer pH, injection pressure, switch-polarity time and voltage. The results of this research will be compared to previous work using MEKC to detect nisin in dairy products. The successful development of this method will be useful to both food and beverage industries as it provides a simple and cost-effective way to monitor nisin levels in a wide variety of products including canned vegetables, fish, milk, cheese and wine.

Department

Chemistry

Faculty Advisor

Kingsley Donkor

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Mar 30th, 9:56 AM Mar 30th, 10:02 AM

Sensitive Detection of Parts-Per-Billion Levels of Nisin in Dairy Products by Capillary Electrophoresis

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Nisin is a polycyclic antimicrobial peptide produced by the gram-positive bacteria, Lactococcus lactis. Due to its antimicrobial properties and low toxicity, nisin is commonly used in the food industry as a preservative in alcoholic beverages and foods such as meat and dairy. Nisin is currently the only lantibiotic that is FDA-approved for use as a biopreservative, however, changes in temperature, pH or interactions with other ingredients can cause nisin’s activity to degrade overtime. For this reason, it is crucial to be able to quantify and monitor the stability of nisin throughout a product’s shelf life. In this project, a technique called micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) will be employed to separate and quantify nisin in dairy products. An additional technique called large volume sample stacking technique (LVSS) will be investigated in order to improve the sensitivity of the method. The method will be optimized by testing parameters such as sample solvent composition, buffer pH, injection pressure, switch-polarity time and voltage. The results of this research will be compared to previous work using MEKC to detect nisin in dairy products. The successful development of this method will be useful to both food and beverage industries as it provides a simple and cost-effective way to monitor nisin levels in a wide variety of products including canned vegetables, fish, milk, cheese and wine.