Presentation Title

Decolonizing Mental Health Practices

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Abstract

In this presentation I will explore the ways that my studies of psychology and Indigenous Studies come together and contemplate how I, as a settler and mental health worker, can best attend to the specific needs of my clients. Canada is a settler colonial structure that reinforces the dominant settler culture, and requires the ongoing dispossession of Indigenous peoples from land. Emerging from these structures of power are various lasting lived implications for Indigenous peoples. As a mental health care provider I have a responsibility to understand the legacies of intergenerational trauma and mental health issues from residential schools, forced relocations, the creation of the reserve system, and the effects of racism that is built into Canadian laws through the Indian Act. Health, illness, psychology, and wellness are socially constructed and defined in the westernized sense. In this presentation I will explore how I can hold space in my Western/settler-informed training in psychology for Indigenous peoples' views on health and wellness, as well as how Indigenous values can be incorporated into current health care practice. This research seeks to study the differences between the westernized biomedical model of mental health, and Indigenous ways of knowing and being, and what that looks like in mental health practice. Further, the goal of this research is to consider my role in decolonizing current practices in counselling, behaviour intervention, and mental health care, to legitimize Indigenous knowledge and integrate it into a holistic approach.

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

Faculty Advisor

Lisa Cooke

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Decolonizing Mental Health Practices

In this presentation I will explore the ways that my studies of psychology and Indigenous Studies come together and contemplate how I, as a settler and mental health worker, can best attend to the specific needs of my clients. Canada is a settler colonial structure that reinforces the dominant settler culture, and requires the ongoing dispossession of Indigenous peoples from land. Emerging from these structures of power are various lasting lived implications for Indigenous peoples. As a mental health care provider I have a responsibility to understand the legacies of intergenerational trauma and mental health issues from residential schools, forced relocations, the creation of the reserve system, and the effects of racism that is built into Canadian laws through the Indian Act. Health, illness, psychology, and wellness are socially constructed and defined in the westernized sense. In this presentation I will explore how I can hold space in my Western/settler-informed training in psychology for Indigenous peoples' views on health and wellness, as well as how Indigenous values can be incorporated into current health care practice. This research seeks to study the differences between the westernized biomedical model of mental health, and Indigenous ways of knowing and being, and what that looks like in mental health practice. Further, the goal of this research is to consider my role in decolonizing current practices in counselling, behaviour intervention, and mental health care, to legitimize Indigenous knowledge and integrate it into a holistic approach.