Presentation Title

Mental Health Stigma in Emergency Responders

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Abstract

The overall all purpose of this research is to address the lack of assistance with stigmas that surround the mental and emotional health issues emergency responders experience on a daily basis. These health issues can culminate in burnout and compassion fatigue, which can lead to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The research methods drawn upon for this presentation are articles written by retired paramedics and advocates for occupational health and safety. As suicide rates rise each year, it must be concluded that there is not enough being done to help emergency responders. It is clear there is also a distinct lack of research into the long-term effects on today’s emergency responders verses the short-term effects from events such as war and natural disasters. The research on which current systems are based is out of date and does not address the current long-term traumatic stress issues that emergency responders experience. Therefore, it is evident that our emergency responders mental and emotional health is overlooked because there are not enough available support systems in place that allow them to feel safe and supported.

Department

English and Modern Languages

Faculty Advisor

Tara Chambers

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Mental Health Stigma in Emergency Responders

The overall all purpose of this research is to address the lack of assistance with stigmas that surround the mental and emotional health issues emergency responders experience on a daily basis. These health issues can culminate in burnout and compassion fatigue, which can lead to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The research methods drawn upon for this presentation are articles written by retired paramedics and advocates for occupational health and safety. As suicide rates rise each year, it must be concluded that there is not enough being done to help emergency responders. It is clear there is also a distinct lack of research into the long-term effects on today’s emergency responders verses the short-term effects from events such as war and natural disasters. The research on which current systems are based is out of date and does not address the current long-term traumatic stress issues that emergency responders experience. Therefore, it is evident that our emergency responders mental and emotional health is overlooked because there are not enough available support systems in place that allow them to feel safe and supported.