Presentation Title

Sidewalk Snow Clearing Research Project: Walkability and Urban Sustainability in Kamloops, Geography 1100

Abstract

Kamloops promotes itself as an environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable community. Being environmentally sustainable includes the ability to walk from place to place easily; however, in winter, snow and ice can inhibit walking. If sidewalks are cleared, one can easily walk in winter and can therefore say that Kamloops is environmentally sustainable. The purpose of this project is to observe how well snow and ice is removed from sidewalks by residents, who are responsible for clearing them. This research involves making repeat observations of snow being removed from the same residential sidewalks. The study is also an exercise to practice research skills in Geography 1100 (Introduction to environmental studies and sustainability). Through the financial support of the TRU Research Office, a senior student has been hired as a Research Coach to assist students with organizing and presenting their research findings. Tentative results are that some residents consistently clear sidewalks immediately after a snowfall --some of them also appear to clear their neighbours’ sidewalks. Other residents remove snow a number of hours after it has fallen. Some people seem to ignore shovelling when there is a light, wet snowfall due to rapid melting. Elevation and degree of exposure to the sun affects how much snow needs to be removed and how often. The principal conclusion is that inconsistent snow and ice removal on residential sidewalks produces a patchwork of poorly connected paths that makes walking a challenge, and thus decreases environmental sustainability.

Class Research Coach: Raelene Mahon

Department

Geography and Environmental Studies

Faculty Advisor

Tom Waldichuk

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Sidewalk Snow Clearing Research Project: Walkability and Urban Sustainability in Kamloops, Geography 1100

Kamloops promotes itself as an environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable community. Being environmentally sustainable includes the ability to walk from place to place easily; however, in winter, snow and ice can inhibit walking. If sidewalks are cleared, one can easily walk in winter and can therefore say that Kamloops is environmentally sustainable. The purpose of this project is to observe how well snow and ice is removed from sidewalks by residents, who are responsible for clearing them. This research involves making repeat observations of snow being removed from the same residential sidewalks. The study is also an exercise to practice research skills in Geography 1100 (Introduction to environmental studies and sustainability). Through the financial support of the TRU Research Office, a senior student has been hired as a Research Coach to assist students with organizing and presenting their research findings. Tentative results are that some residents consistently clear sidewalks immediately after a snowfall --some of them also appear to clear their neighbours’ sidewalks. Other residents remove snow a number of hours after it has fallen. Some people seem to ignore shovelling when there is a light, wet snowfall due to rapid melting. Elevation and degree of exposure to the sun affects how much snow needs to be removed and how often. The principal conclusion is that inconsistent snow and ice removal on residential sidewalks produces a patchwork of poorly connected paths that makes walking a challenge, and thus decreases environmental sustainability.

Class Research Coach: Raelene Mahon