Presentation Title

"North Now": ANTH 4040 Final Project Showcase

Presenter Information

Abstract

In this course we journey North – through the layers of meaning, power, politics, history, and representation that come together to form what we know as North. As we do, we are contemplating North as a landscape of (mostly southern) settler colonial desire upon which national-cultural interests are inscribed… North as resource rich. North as pristine wilderness. North as scape of adventure and self-discovery. North as beautiful. North as hostile and terrifying….

As we unpack these cultural representations and imaginaries, we’re thinking too about those who for whom these same landscapes are home. We’re thinking about the ways that settler colonial desires fold northern Indigenous peoples into their narratives as either invisible (wilderness is unpeopled, after all) or hypervisible (as tragic figures, destitute communities, or alternatively iconic symbols).

Our goal in this showcase is to carve out a space where contemporary life lived in northern communities can be shared in its own terms. Where media representations of tragedy or hardship are contextualized. Where environmental issues are fleshed out and all ways of knowing and being are honoured.

In this showcase of our final projects, we invite our TRU community to journey North alongside us, reflecting on what we imagine North to be, where this information comes from, what it gets used for, and how we can challenge the ways that settler colonial power relations are reenergized through them.

With gratitude,

Winter 2020, ANTH 4040 Class.

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

Faculty Advisor

Lisa Cooke

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"North Now": ANTH 4040 Final Project Showcase

In this course we journey North – through the layers of meaning, power, politics, history, and representation that come together to form what we know as North. As we do, we are contemplating North as a landscape of (mostly southern) settler colonial desire upon which national-cultural interests are inscribed… North as resource rich. North as pristine wilderness. North as scape of adventure and self-discovery. North as beautiful. North as hostile and terrifying….

As we unpack these cultural representations and imaginaries, we’re thinking too about those who for whom these same landscapes are home. We’re thinking about the ways that settler colonial desires fold northern Indigenous peoples into their narratives as either invisible (wilderness is unpeopled, after all) or hypervisible (as tragic figures, destitute communities, or alternatively iconic symbols).

Our goal in this showcase is to carve out a space where contemporary life lived in northern communities can be shared in its own terms. Where media representations of tragedy or hardship are contextualized. Where environmental issues are fleshed out and all ways of knowing and being are honoured.

In this showcase of our final projects, we invite our TRU community to journey North alongside us, reflecting on what we imagine North to be, where this information comes from, what it gets used for, and how we can challenge the ways that settler colonial power relations are reenergized through them.

With gratitude,

Winter 2020, ANTH 4040 Class.