Presentation Title

Population Analysis of Invasive Goldfish (Carassius auratus) in Dragon Lake, BC

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

The common goldfish (Carassius auratus), an invasive species in British Columbia, has been introduced into several waterbodies containing rainbow trout throughout the province. In 2009, a productive population of goldfish was identified by the Ministry of Forest, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (MFLNRORD) in Dragon Lake, a eutrophic lake near Quesnel, British Columbia. Electrofishing was used to collect a sample of goldfish from Dragon Lake in order to analyze their population. The goldfish appeared to exist in 4 separate age cohorts, and there was a significant relationship between length and weight with a linear regression of the natural log of length and weight with an equation of y=-12.78+3.44x. The goldfish also displayed a growth rate that slowed between the ages of 5 and 6 years old. To limit damages caused by invasive goldfish the BC government should undertake immediate action to eradicate or reduce the goldfish population within Dragon Lake; public education to help eliminate further goldfish introductions is also needed.

Department

Natural Resource Science

Faculty Advisor

Brian Heise

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Population Analysis of Invasive Goldfish (Carassius auratus) in Dragon Lake, BC

The common goldfish (Carassius auratus), an invasive species in British Columbia, has been introduced into several waterbodies containing rainbow trout throughout the province. In 2009, a productive population of goldfish was identified by the Ministry of Forest, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (MFLNRORD) in Dragon Lake, a eutrophic lake near Quesnel, British Columbia. Electrofishing was used to collect a sample of goldfish from Dragon Lake in order to analyze their population. The goldfish appeared to exist in 4 separate age cohorts, and there was a significant relationship between length and weight with a linear regression of the natural log of length and weight with an equation of y=-12.78+3.44x. The goldfish also displayed a growth rate that slowed between the ages of 5 and 6 years old. To limit damages caused by invasive goldfish the BC government should undertake immediate action to eradicate or reduce the goldfish population within Dragon Lake; public education to help eliminate further goldfish introductions is also needed.