Presentation Title

The Impact of Exogenous Ketone Salt Supplementation on Oxygen Uptake Kinetics During Heavy Intensity Exercise

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Exogenous ketone supplementation and inducing dietary ketosis is a popular strategy suggested to improve performance. However, exogenous ketone salt supplementation has been shown to decrease performance, but mechanisms have not been examined. We aimed to examine whether supplementing with exogenous ketone salts alters heavy exercise domain oxygen uptake kinetics compared to an isocaloric carbohydrate supplementation. Participants completed a ramp incremental test on a cycle ergometer to determine VO2max, ventilatory threshold (VT), and respiratory compensation (RC) point. An intensity of 33% of the difference between VT and RC was calculated for subsequent trials. On 4 separate days, participants ingested either a ketone salt or carbohydrate drink ~30-minutes before testing. This was followed by a brief warm-up (5-minutes: 50W), then the exercise immediately transitioned to the heavy-intensity exercise domain for 8-minutes before returning to 50W. Each trial was mono-exponentially fit and the time-constant of the primary component (t), baseline and amplitude of the VO2 response was determined. Participants exhibited similar baselines (p=0.56) and amplitudes (p = 0.70) across conditions. This preliminary data did show slower kinetics, under the ketone condition, but this did not reach significance (41.1 ± 12.7 vs. 32.5 ± 21.2, p = 0.17). These data suggest that metabolic efficiency is similar and that ketone salt supplementation does not improve the transition from one metabolic rate to another during exercise. In conclusion, these preliminary data suggest that ketone salt supplementation may not be ideal in those seeking to improve intense exercise performance.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

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The Impact of Exogenous Ketone Salt Supplementation on Oxygen Uptake Kinetics During Heavy Intensity Exercise

Exogenous ketone supplementation and inducing dietary ketosis is a popular strategy suggested to improve performance. However, exogenous ketone salt supplementation has been shown to decrease performance, but mechanisms have not been examined. We aimed to examine whether supplementing with exogenous ketone salts alters heavy exercise domain oxygen uptake kinetics compared to an isocaloric carbohydrate supplementation. Participants completed a ramp incremental test on a cycle ergometer to determine VO2max, ventilatory threshold (VT), and respiratory compensation (RC) point. An intensity of 33% of the difference between VT and RC was calculated for subsequent trials. On 4 separate days, participants ingested either a ketone salt or carbohydrate drink ~30-minutes before testing. This was followed by a brief warm-up (5-minutes: 50W), then the exercise immediately transitioned to the heavy-intensity exercise domain for 8-minutes before returning to 50W. Each trial was mono-exponentially fit and the time-constant of the primary component (t), baseline and amplitude of the VO2 response was determined. Participants exhibited similar baselines (p=0.56) and amplitudes (p = 0.70) across conditions. This preliminary data did show slower kinetics, under the ketone condition, but this did not reach significance (41.1 ± 12.7 vs. 32.5 ± 21.2, p = 0.17). These data suggest that metabolic efficiency is similar and that ketone salt supplementation does not improve the transition from one metabolic rate to another during exercise. In conclusion, these preliminary data suggest that ketone salt supplementation may not be ideal in those seeking to improve intense exercise performance.