Presentation Title

Characterization of the Antimicrobial Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Cave Bacteria Streptomyces ICC1

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

The progression of antibiotic resistant microorganisms has hindered some of the commercially available pharmaceutical drugs ineffective. Therefore, there is an overwhelming need for new alternatives against multi-drug resistant microbes, or mankind is likely to be surpassed in the current coevolution race between ourselves and bacteria. This study examines the secondary metabolites produced by cave-dwelling Streptomyces sp. ICC1 strain, which is prevalent in the isolated environment of the Iron Curtain Cave in Chilliwack, British Columbia. The secondary metabolites secreted by Streptomyces sp. ICC1 strain have shown antimicrobial properties that are effective against both laboratory and multi-drug resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In extreme-conditions, such as a cave, microbial species often exhibit bioactivity that arises from resilient physiology and specialized metabolic pathways.

Streptomyces sp. ICC1 strain will be grown in a temperature of 15°C in both nutrient agar and broth. This strain has been exposed to many different media types and seems to favour a simple nutrient broth, here the cave dwellers produced the characteristic brown pigment in 72 hours. Bioassays will be performed to confirm antimicrobial activity in both laboratory and drug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Upon presence of bioactivity, extractions will be performed to isolate the active compound(s), which will then be purified via high performance liquid chromatography. The secondary metabolites have been reasoned to exhibit both polar and non-polar substituents. Therefore, further instrumental analysis performed on pure samples must be done to reveal the true molecular nature of the bioactive metabolites, as well as their mode of action.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Heidi Huttunen-Hennelly and Naowarat Cheeptham

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Characterization of the Antimicrobial Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Cave Bacteria Streptomyces ICC1

The progression of antibiotic resistant microorganisms has hindered some of the commercially available pharmaceutical drugs ineffective. Therefore, there is an overwhelming need for new alternatives against multi-drug resistant microbes, or mankind is likely to be surpassed in the current coevolution race between ourselves and bacteria. This study examines the secondary metabolites produced by cave-dwelling Streptomyces sp. ICC1 strain, which is prevalent in the isolated environment of the Iron Curtain Cave in Chilliwack, British Columbia. The secondary metabolites secreted by Streptomyces sp. ICC1 strain have shown antimicrobial properties that are effective against both laboratory and multi-drug resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In extreme-conditions, such as a cave, microbial species often exhibit bioactivity that arises from resilient physiology and specialized metabolic pathways.

Streptomyces sp. ICC1 strain will be grown in a temperature of 15°C in both nutrient agar and broth. This strain has been exposed to many different media types and seems to favour a simple nutrient broth, here the cave dwellers produced the characteristic brown pigment in 72 hours. Bioassays will be performed to confirm antimicrobial activity in both laboratory and drug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Upon presence of bioactivity, extractions will be performed to isolate the active compound(s), which will then be purified via high performance liquid chromatography. The secondary metabolites have been reasoned to exhibit both polar and non-polar substituents. Therefore, further instrumental analysis performed on pure samples must be done to reveal the true molecular nature of the bioactive metabolites, as well as their mode of action.