Presentation Title

The Impact of Prostaglandin Inhibition on Platelet Microvesicle Dynamics During High-intensity Exercise

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Microvesicles are small (100nm-1μm) membrane-derived vesicles that confer information about a cell's status. Platelet microvesicles (PMV) have recently been described in a plethora of papers for their role in cell-cell signalling and disease. Bouts of high intensity exercise increase the concentration of circulating PMVs within the blood, which may adversely increase blood coagulation but also may stimulate new blood vessel formation. Alternatively, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (Ibuprofen, Aspirin, etc.) inhibit platelet function, which could blunt PMV production. Ten participants were recruited and their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2) max determined by having them exercise on a stationary bike until exhaustion during a ramp of 4 watts every 10 seconds. Their ventilatory thresholds (VT) were identified and the work-rate at 1/3 of that between VT1 and VT2 was determined for subsequent experimental trials. During these trials, participants ingested a placebo or ibuprofen (600mg) pill 2 hours prior to exercise. Nine ml blood samples were taken immediately prior, post, 45 minutes post, and 90 minutes post exercise. Platelet-free plasma was isolated from the blood by two rounds of centrifugation. One hundred microlitre aliquots of the centrifuged samples were placed into 1.7ml centrifuge tubes and frozen at -80°C. Samples will be thawed and double stained with cluster of differentiation 41-fluorescein isothiocyanate (CD41-FITC) and CD62E-Phycoerythrin (PE) conjugated antibodies prior to being analyzed by high resolution flow cytometer for PMVs quantification. We will determine if NSAIDs inhibit the release of platelet-derived microvesicles.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

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The Impact of Prostaglandin Inhibition on Platelet Microvesicle Dynamics During High-intensity Exercise

Microvesicles are small (100nm-1μm) membrane-derived vesicles that confer information about a cell's status. Platelet microvesicles (PMV) have recently been described in a plethora of papers for their role in cell-cell signalling and disease. Bouts of high intensity exercise increase the concentration of circulating PMVs within the blood, which may adversely increase blood coagulation but also may stimulate new blood vessel formation. Alternatively, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (Ibuprofen, Aspirin, etc.) inhibit platelet function, which could blunt PMV production. Ten participants were recruited and their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2) max determined by having them exercise on a stationary bike until exhaustion during a ramp of 4 watts every 10 seconds. Their ventilatory thresholds (VT) were identified and the work-rate at 1/3 of that between VT1 and VT2 was determined for subsequent experimental trials. During these trials, participants ingested a placebo or ibuprofen (600mg) pill 2 hours prior to exercise. Nine ml blood samples were taken immediately prior, post, 45 minutes post, and 90 minutes post exercise. Platelet-free plasma was isolated from the blood by two rounds of centrifugation. One hundred microlitre aliquots of the centrifuged samples were placed into 1.7ml centrifuge tubes and frozen at -80°C. Samples will be thawed and double stained with cluster of differentiation 41-fluorescein isothiocyanate (CD41-FITC) and CD62E-Phycoerythrin (PE) conjugated antibodies prior to being analyzed by high resolution flow cytometer for PMVs quantification. We will determine if NSAIDs inhibit the release of platelet-derived microvesicles.