Presentation Title

Determination of the Octanol:Water Partition Coefficient of Indolicidin45 by Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Antibiotic resistant bacteria (superbugs) are becoming a real problem in today’s world. There are new bacteria emerging that are completely resistant to the pharmaceutical industry's conventional antibiotics such as penicillin. These superbugs are extremely dangerous as there is essentially no way to kill them and many resulting sicknesses have fatal results. In recent years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have begun to garner interest. AMPs show a lot of potential to becoming a solution for the antimicrobial resistant pandemic the future holds. The AMP, indol45, an analog of indolicidin which has had the 4th and 5th tryptophan residues replaced with alanine, has shown increased antimicrobial activity along with reduced hemolytic activity when compared to indolicidin, making it a more viable candidate as an antimicrobial agent. The antibacterial properties of this peptide are still unknown. Whether the bacteria are killed via lyses of its membrane or by an intracellular mechanism is unknown. The aim of this research is to utilize the VEKC technique to determine the octanol-water partition coefficient. VEKC is a vesicular variation of Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography (MEKC). By determining the partition coefficient, the ability of the drug to pass through the membrane of bacteria can be determined, helping us better understand the mode of action of indol and its derivative indol45’s antibacterial properties, elucidating its potential ability as a therapeutic antimicrobial agent.

Department

Other

Chemical Biology

Faculty Advisor

Heidi Huttunen-Hennelly

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Determination of the Octanol:Water Partition Coefficient of Indolicidin45 by Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography

Antibiotic resistant bacteria (superbugs) are becoming a real problem in today’s world. There are new bacteria emerging that are completely resistant to the pharmaceutical industry's conventional antibiotics such as penicillin. These superbugs are extremely dangerous as there is essentially no way to kill them and many resulting sicknesses have fatal results. In recent years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have begun to garner interest. AMPs show a lot of potential to becoming a solution for the antimicrobial resistant pandemic the future holds. The AMP, indol45, an analog of indolicidin which has had the 4th and 5th tryptophan residues replaced with alanine, has shown increased antimicrobial activity along with reduced hemolytic activity when compared to indolicidin, making it a more viable candidate as an antimicrobial agent. The antibacterial properties of this peptide are still unknown. Whether the bacteria are killed via lyses of its membrane or by an intracellular mechanism is unknown. The aim of this research is to utilize the VEKC technique to determine the octanol-water partition coefficient. VEKC is a vesicular variation of Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography (MEKC). By determining the partition coefficient, the ability of the drug to pass through the membrane of bacteria can be determined, helping us better understand the mode of action of indol and its derivative indol45’s antibacterial properties, elucidating its potential ability as a therapeutic antimicrobial agent.