Presentation Title

The Impact of Ketone Salt Supplementations on Heart Rate Responses Muscle Metabolism During Exercise

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

The consumption and marketing of some ketone supplements has been increasing recently suggesting that inducing muscle ketosis may improve performance, despite little evidence. In fact, several ketone effects may actually lead to poorer performance caused by acidification of the blood, alterations in heart rates and potential changes in muscle efficiency and substrate utilization. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dietary ketone salt supplementation during rapid changes in exercise intensity and muscle metabolism. We had participants attend the lab on 5 occasions with the first visit to determine maximal aerobic fitness (O2max) and specific workloads for the subsequent 2 placebo and 2 ketone exercise trials. At each subsequent visit (placebo or ketone), we had participants complete a 5 min warm-up at 50 watts and then an immediate intensity change to a higher work-rate for 8 minutes. We continuously monitored heart rate and oxygen uptake throughout these sessions. We then compared work efficiency (metabolic rate/workrate) of both placebo and ketone trials over last 3 minutes of each trial. In addition, we fit the heart rate responses with a monoexponential equation to examine differences in heart rate responses between conditions. With this research we expect to gain insight about whether dietary supplementation with ketone salts affects our metabolic efficiency and heart rate responses thus contributing or detracting from exercise performance.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

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The Impact of Ketone Salt Supplementations on Heart Rate Responses Muscle Metabolism During Exercise

The consumption and marketing of some ketone supplements has been increasing recently suggesting that inducing muscle ketosis may improve performance, despite little evidence. In fact, several ketone effects may actually lead to poorer performance caused by acidification of the blood, alterations in heart rates and potential changes in muscle efficiency and substrate utilization. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dietary ketone salt supplementation during rapid changes in exercise intensity and muscle metabolism. We had participants attend the lab on 5 occasions with the first visit to determine maximal aerobic fitness (O2max) and specific workloads for the subsequent 2 placebo and 2 ketone exercise trials. At each subsequent visit (placebo or ketone), we had participants complete a 5 min warm-up at 50 watts and then an immediate intensity change to a higher work-rate for 8 minutes. We continuously monitored heart rate and oxygen uptake throughout these sessions. We then compared work efficiency (metabolic rate/workrate) of both placebo and ketone trials over last 3 minutes of each trial. In addition, we fit the heart rate responses with a monoexponential equation to examine differences in heart rate responses between conditions. With this research we expect to gain insight about whether dietary supplementation with ketone salts affects our metabolic efficiency and heart rate responses thus contributing or detracting from exercise performance.