Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Regeneration of planted Interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) has been a challenge for foresters in the interior of British Columbia (B.C.) due to frost damage, drought, and low mycorrhizal associations. With the need to plant large volumes of Interior Douglas-fir after the 2017 and 2018 wildfires in B.C., foresters are looking for methods which will increase production and survival of seedlings in burnt areas. In this study the effects of slow release fertilizer packs on Interior Douglas-fir planted seedling within a high severity fire area in the Elephant Hill Wildfire area are examined after one growing season. Planted on May 24, 2019 then measured and assessed on August 20and 21, 2019, the fertilized seedlings, compared to the control seedlings, showed no differences in growth parameters which included leader length, root collar diameter, shoot weight, root weight and total weight. Fertilized seedling had a statistically larger height compared to control seedlings (P value = 0.02) but when seedling with no leaders present were removed from the height data set no statistical difference was found (P value = 0.43 ). Seedling vigour was scored on a scale of 1 to 5, there was no statistical difference in vigour for fertilized and control seedlings. Leader damage caused by frost, insects or browse effected 35% of the control seedlings and 22% of fertilized seedlings. These results indicate that using slow release fertilizer after a high severity fire does not provide increased growth or vigour after one growing season in the interior of B.C.

Department

Natural Resource Science

Faculty Advisor

Wendy Gardner

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Impact of Slow Release Fertilizer Packs on Planted Interior Douglas-fir Seedlings After One Growing Season in the Elephant Hill Burn

Regeneration of planted Interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) has been a challenge for foresters in the interior of British Columbia (B.C.) due to frost damage, drought, and low mycorrhizal associations. With the need to plant large volumes of Interior Douglas-fir after the 2017 and 2018 wildfires in B.C., foresters are looking for methods which will increase production and survival of seedlings in burnt areas. In this study the effects of slow release fertilizer packs on Interior Douglas-fir planted seedling within a high severity fire area in the Elephant Hill Wildfire area are examined after one growing season. Planted on May 24, 2019 then measured and assessed on August 20and 21, 2019, the fertilized seedlings, compared to the control seedlings, showed no differences in growth parameters which included leader length, root collar diameter, shoot weight, root weight and total weight. Fertilized seedling had a statistically larger height compared to control seedlings (P value = 0.02) but when seedling with no leaders present were removed from the height data set no statistical difference was found (P value = 0.43 ). Seedling vigour was scored on a scale of 1 to 5, there was no statistical difference in vigour for fertilized and control seedlings. Leader damage caused by frost, insects or browse effected 35% of the control seedlings and 22% of fertilized seedlings. These results indicate that using slow release fertilizer after a high severity fire does not provide increased growth or vigour after one growing season in the interior of B.C.

 

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