Presentation Title

Antimutagenic Assay Analysis and Lectin Extraction Relative to Genotoxicity in Arceuthobium americanum

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

It is expected that one in two Canadians will be affected by cancer in their lifetime, and one in four will die from it. Due to the abundance and lethality of the disease, alternative methods of treatment are being looked at to slow down the rate of DNA mutations. Antimutagens work by preventing spontaneous DNA damage, which could potentially lead to permanent, irreversible damage. In Europe, some studies have shown the effectiveness of combining Viscus album extracts as an antimutagen concurrently with chemotherapy to slow down the rate of DNA damage upon tumorigenesis. In British Columbia, the Lodgepole Pine Dwarf Mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum) grows, which is in the same phylogenetic family as V. album, and shares its parasitic nature. Studies have shown that the lectins (carbohydrate binding proteins) in V. album play a vital role in the antimutagenic properties, likely due to the high binding affinity to N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylneuraminic acid sugars, which are found on the cell surface, and therefore interaction with them could alter the regulation of programmed cell death. This study aims to extract and identify a similar lectin in A. americanum, and use the extract to begin testing for antimutagenic properties in Prokaryotic systems, using the Ames test and SOS Chromotest in Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli respectively, using xenogenic mutants of the respective bacteria cultures to test for growth of cultures upon a lack of a specific nutrient in the former case, or the catabolism of lactose in the latter case.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Joanna Urban

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Antimutagenic Assay Analysis and Lectin Extraction Relative to Genotoxicity in Arceuthobium americanum

It is expected that one in two Canadians will be affected by cancer in their lifetime, and one in four will die from it. Due to the abundance and lethality of the disease, alternative methods of treatment are being looked at to slow down the rate of DNA mutations. Antimutagens work by preventing spontaneous DNA damage, which could potentially lead to permanent, irreversible damage. In Europe, some studies have shown the effectiveness of combining Viscus album extracts as an antimutagen concurrently with chemotherapy to slow down the rate of DNA damage upon tumorigenesis. In British Columbia, the Lodgepole Pine Dwarf Mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum) grows, which is in the same phylogenetic family as V. album, and shares its parasitic nature. Studies have shown that the lectins (carbohydrate binding proteins) in V. album play a vital role in the antimutagenic properties, likely due to the high binding affinity to N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylneuraminic acid sugars, which are found on the cell surface, and therefore interaction with them could alter the regulation of programmed cell death. This study aims to extract and identify a similar lectin in A. americanum, and use the extract to begin testing for antimutagenic properties in Prokaryotic systems, using the Ames test and SOS Chromotest in Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli respectively, using xenogenic mutants of the respective bacteria cultures to test for growth of cultures upon a lack of a specific nutrient in the former case, or the catabolism of lactose in the latter case.