Presentation Title

Calculating Genomic Distances Between Three Brassica Species and Arabidopsis thaliana

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Presenter Information

Bronwen EvansFollow

Location

IB 1010

Start Date

30-3-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

30-3-2019 1:45 PM

Abstract

The Brassica genus is notable for its extraordinary variety of food crops and potential biofuels. Turnips, mustards, and cabbages are just a few of the plants that fall under the Brassica umbrella, and one of Canada’s most important crops, canola, is also a member of the genus. In order to genetically improve these crops, researchers need to understand how useful traits evolved in different species. One tool for understanding the evolutionary pathways of Brassica plants is by measuring the genomic distances between them. This project used the Double-Cut-And-Join (DCJ) model to calculate these distances and build rearrangements that give insight into how the genomes evolved and where they differ from one another. The research project focused on calculating the DCJ distances between Arabidopsis thaliana, a model organism, and three main Brassica species.

Department

Computing Science

Faculty Advisor

Lingling Jin

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Mar 30th, 1:30 PM Mar 30th, 1:45 PM

Calculating Genomic Distances Between Three Brassica Species and Arabidopsis thaliana

IB 1010

The Brassica genus is notable for its extraordinary variety of food crops and potential biofuels. Turnips, mustards, and cabbages are just a few of the plants that fall under the Brassica umbrella, and one of Canada’s most important crops, canola, is also a member of the genus. In order to genetically improve these crops, researchers need to understand how useful traits evolved in different species. One tool for understanding the evolutionary pathways of Brassica plants is by measuring the genomic distances between them. This project used the Double-Cut-And-Join (DCJ) model to calculate these distances and build rearrangements that give insight into how the genomes evolved and where they differ from one another. The research project focused on calculating the DCJ distances between Arabidopsis thaliana, a model organism, and three main Brassica species.