Presentation Title

Data Privacy in the Age of Social Media Addiction

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Presenter Information

Alexi OrchardFollow

Location

IB 1010

Start Date

30-3-2019 11:45 AM

End Date

30-3-2019 12:00 PM

Abstract

In the 21st century, social media has rapidly become a part of everyday life. It is almost unavoidable for individuals to partake in to keep up with their personal and professional lives. People can be consumed by their devices and applications for many hours a day in an attempt to stay connected. This prompts the following questions: Does daily social media consumption share characteristics of symptoms of addiction? Is there a stage of addiction that inhibits individuals’ concern for online privacy and security? This research explores the overarching question, “Do individuals who exhibit signs of social media addiction prioritize their social utility over their personal data privacy?” It is an interdisciplinary project which employs a two-part quantitative survey to compare responses about addictive social media behaviours and attitudes towards personal data privacy. Derived from past research on Facebook addiction, part one of the study evaluates participants’ inclination to demonstrate symptoms of social media addiction. Part two allows participants to rate their knowledge and concern for the data they provide to companies by using their platforms. The results of this research will shed light on any significant correlations between the participants’ social media usage and their disposition towards data privacy.

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty Advisor

Tracy Penny Light and Blair McDonald

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Mar 30th, 11:45 AM Mar 30th, 12:00 PM

Data Privacy in the Age of Social Media Addiction

IB 1010

In the 21st century, social media has rapidly become a part of everyday life. It is almost unavoidable for individuals to partake in to keep up with their personal and professional lives. People can be consumed by their devices and applications for many hours a day in an attempt to stay connected. This prompts the following questions: Does daily social media consumption share characteristics of symptoms of addiction? Is there a stage of addiction that inhibits individuals’ concern for online privacy and security? This research explores the overarching question, “Do individuals who exhibit signs of social media addiction prioritize their social utility over their personal data privacy?” It is an interdisciplinary project which employs a two-part quantitative survey to compare responses about addictive social media behaviours and attitudes towards personal data privacy. Derived from past research on Facebook addiction, part one of the study evaluates participants’ inclination to demonstrate symptoms of social media addiction. Part two allows participants to rate their knowledge and concern for the data they provide to companies by using their platforms. The results of this research will shed light on any significant correlations between the participants’ social media usage and their disposition towards data privacy.