Presentation Title

Student Cities: Examining How International Students Transform the Economic, Social and Political Fabric of Town-Gown Communities

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Presenter Information

Richmond Ho Shing YuFollow

Location

IB 1008

Start Date

30-3-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

30-3-2019 12:15 PM

Abstract

International students are students of different age and grade levels who travel from their home countries for different educational purposes. For instance, students may enroll in short term immersion programs, which last from two weeks to a year, where they learn new languages and experience foreign cultures. On the other hand, some international students pursue long-term studies. These students choose to complete their academic degree abroad. In recent decades, schools around the world have gradually been adopting internationalized education curricula. Hence, universities across the globe are forming alliances, triggering a mass influx of students migrating to urban and rural college/university communities. Scholars have uncovered that international students are urban agents who accelerate economic, social, and political transformations of college/university towns. The primary objective of this research is to understand how international college/university students alter the economic, cultural, and political fabrics of town-gown (college/university) communities. This presentation utilizes peer-reviewed articles, academic journals, government documents, and personal observations to answer three major questions. First, can we identify the push-pull factors that influence one's decision to move to a specific college/university town? Second, how do international students influence urban transformations in college/university towns? Finally, how do international students transform the urban fabrics of two different communal scales: the micro- and macro-scale? The micro-scale explores the studentification of college/university towns within Canada while the macro-scale examines different college/university towns around the world.

Department

Geography and Environmental Studies

Faculty Advisor

Tom Waldichuk

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Mar 30th, 12:00 PM Mar 30th, 12:15 PM

Student Cities: Examining How International Students Transform the Economic, Social and Political Fabric of Town-Gown Communities

IB 1008

International students are students of different age and grade levels who travel from their home countries for different educational purposes. For instance, students may enroll in short term immersion programs, which last from two weeks to a year, where they learn new languages and experience foreign cultures. On the other hand, some international students pursue long-term studies. These students choose to complete their academic degree abroad. In recent decades, schools around the world have gradually been adopting internationalized education curricula. Hence, universities across the globe are forming alliances, triggering a mass influx of students migrating to urban and rural college/university communities. Scholars have uncovered that international students are urban agents who accelerate economic, social, and political transformations of college/university towns. The primary objective of this research is to understand how international college/university students alter the economic, cultural, and political fabrics of town-gown (college/university) communities. This presentation utilizes peer-reviewed articles, academic journals, government documents, and personal observations to answer three major questions. First, can we identify the push-pull factors that influence one's decision to move to a specific college/university town? Second, how do international students influence urban transformations in college/university towns? Finally, how do international students transform the urban fabrics of two different communal scales: the micro- and macro-scale? The micro-scale explores the studentification of college/university towns within Canada while the macro-scale examines different college/university towns around the world.