Presentation Title

Exploring Elements of Responsible Tourism: A Case Study at the Adams River Salmon Run

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Presenter Information

Fauve Q. Garson-StewartFollow

Location

IB 1015

Start Date

30-3-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

30-3-2019 10:45 AM

Abstract

While tourism has numerous positive impacts, it is also capable of damaging communities and environments irreversibly. This is particularly prevalent in the context of natural events, which are often extremely fragile by nature. These types of events have been described as events which occur at a specific place, at a specific time, lasting from a few seconds to a few weeks and are not organized by humans. While studies have been conducted on the behaviour of tourists and their willingness to partake in sustainable tourism, little research has been undertaken regarding whether natural events can act as a catalyst for responsible tourist behaviour. Responsible tourism is defined as tourism that minimizes negative social, economic and environmental impacts and focuses on the creation of optimal places for people to live and for tourists to visit. This project uses the Salute to the Sockeye festival held at Ts’utswecw Provincial Park in Squilax, BC, as a case study to assess the sustainability of the visitor experience at the salmon run and seeks to provide insights from both a supply and demand perspective through analyzed stakeholder interviews and visitor profiles.

Department

Tourism Management

Faculty Advisor

John Hull

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Mar 30th, 10:30 AM Mar 30th, 10:45 AM

Exploring Elements of Responsible Tourism: A Case Study at the Adams River Salmon Run

IB 1015

While tourism has numerous positive impacts, it is also capable of damaging communities and environments irreversibly. This is particularly prevalent in the context of natural events, which are often extremely fragile by nature. These types of events have been described as events which occur at a specific place, at a specific time, lasting from a few seconds to a few weeks and are not organized by humans. While studies have been conducted on the behaviour of tourists and their willingness to partake in sustainable tourism, little research has been undertaken regarding whether natural events can act as a catalyst for responsible tourist behaviour. Responsible tourism is defined as tourism that minimizes negative social, economic and environmental impacts and focuses on the creation of optimal places for people to live and for tourists to visit. This project uses the Salute to the Sockeye festival held at Ts’utswecw Provincial Park in Squilax, BC, as a case study to assess the sustainability of the visitor experience at the salmon run and seeks to provide insights from both a supply and demand perspective through analyzed stakeholder interviews and visitor profiles.