Presentation Title

The Effect of Microvesicles on Insulin Transcytosis by Endothelial Cells

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Jesse R. BiddlecombeFollow

Abstract

Insulin resistance is a resultant condition from prolonged periods of muscle disuse. As such, in addition to disturbances in glycemic homeostasis, vascular perturbations on insulin signalling as a result of physical inactivity may also contribute to etiology. Delivery of insulin to peripheral tissues, such as skeletal muscle, requires capillary recruitment and movement from circulation to interstitial space. Endothelial cells form a continuous endothelium lining the microvasculature of muscle tissue. Interaction of insulin with high affinity receptors on the apical surface of endothelial cells allows insulin transport through the active process of transcytosis. Unlike other insulin sensitive cell types, endothelial cells are capable of transcytosis through a non-degradative pathway; integral in the regulation of insulin availability to skeletal myocytes and modulating insulin sensitivity. Current research investigating insulin resistance suggests exercise countermeasure, which has been observed to alter concentrations of circulating microvesicles. The aim of the present study was to explicate the effect of microvesicles on insulin transcytosis by endothelial cells. Plasma samples collected pre- and post- 45 minutes of high intensity exercise were obtained from a previous study and the microvesicles isolated through centrifugation. Transcytosis assays were performed using the Ea.hy926 cell line, and exposure to microvesicle containing or platelet poor plasma occurred prior to incubation with fluorescently conjugated insulin and dextran. Fluorescence was quantified using the Quantstudio system, and the rates of transcytosis compared. Results of this study demonstrate the effect of microvesicles on the glucoregulatory process of transcytosis by endothelial cells, and the influence of exercise on this action.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

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The Effect of Microvesicles on Insulin Transcytosis by Endothelial Cells

Insulin resistance is a resultant condition from prolonged periods of muscle disuse. As such, in addition to disturbances in glycemic homeostasis, vascular perturbations on insulin signalling as a result of physical inactivity may also contribute to etiology. Delivery of insulin to peripheral tissues, such as skeletal muscle, requires capillary recruitment and movement from circulation to interstitial space. Endothelial cells form a continuous endothelium lining the microvasculature of muscle tissue. Interaction of insulin with high affinity receptors on the apical surface of endothelial cells allows insulin transport through the active process of transcytosis. Unlike other insulin sensitive cell types, endothelial cells are capable of transcytosis through a non-degradative pathway; integral in the regulation of insulin availability to skeletal myocytes and modulating insulin sensitivity. Current research investigating insulin resistance suggests exercise countermeasure, which has been observed to alter concentrations of circulating microvesicles. The aim of the present study was to explicate the effect of microvesicles on insulin transcytosis by endothelial cells. Plasma samples collected pre- and post- 45 minutes of high intensity exercise were obtained from a previous study and the microvesicles isolated through centrifugation. Transcytosis assays were performed using the Ea.hy926 cell line, and exposure to microvesicle containing or platelet poor plasma occurred prior to incubation with fluorescently conjugated insulin and dextran. Fluorescence was quantified using the Quantstudio system, and the rates of transcytosis compared. Results of this study demonstrate the effect of microvesicles on the glucoregulatory process of transcytosis by endothelial cells, and the influence of exercise on this action.