Presentation Title

The Impact of Ketone Supplementation Through Diet and Exercise on Oxygen Uptake Kinetics and Muscle Metabolism

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Tyson W. StrandtFollow

Abstract

There is a growing popularity in the dietary supplementation of ketones and inducing dietary ketosis, a state where the body burns fats rather than carbohydrates. This was the inspiration for our project, which aimed to exhibit the physiological benefits of supplementing ketones rather than carbohydrates. The purpose of this project is to examine the physiological effect of dietary supplementation of ketone salts on oxygen uptake and muscle metabolism. Furthermore, we monitored and examined the physiological differences seen with the same testing being undergone with placebo and utilized that data to determine if the effects can be attributed to ketone supplementation. We had participants undergo 9 total trials, one of which is a VO2max test, used to measure the maximal exertion of the participant, and utilized this for energy domain information in the subsequent 8 trials. The 8 trials, aside from supplement consumption, will remain identical: participants had a 5-minute warm-up, then a 5-minute rest break, followed by a 3-minute baseline, and then proceeded into the heavy intensity exercise domain for 8-minutes before returning to a reduced wattage to cool down for 3 minutes. We utilized a metabolic cart along with an ERG bike and a standardized value of 0.45g/kg of mass of ketones to conduct our research. The research shows that the effects of a 0.45g/kg supplementation can vary in comparison to the placebo with regards to its effects on oxygen uptake and muscle metabolism.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

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The Impact of Ketone Supplementation Through Diet and Exercise on Oxygen Uptake Kinetics and Muscle Metabolism

There is a growing popularity in the dietary supplementation of ketones and inducing dietary ketosis, a state where the body burns fats rather than carbohydrates. This was the inspiration for our project, which aimed to exhibit the physiological benefits of supplementing ketones rather than carbohydrates. The purpose of this project is to examine the physiological effect of dietary supplementation of ketone salts on oxygen uptake and muscle metabolism. Furthermore, we monitored and examined the physiological differences seen with the same testing being undergone with placebo and utilized that data to determine if the effects can be attributed to ketone supplementation. We had participants undergo 9 total trials, one of which is a VO2max test, used to measure the maximal exertion of the participant, and utilized this for energy domain information in the subsequent 8 trials. The 8 trials, aside from supplement consumption, will remain identical: participants had a 5-minute warm-up, then a 5-minute rest break, followed by a 3-minute baseline, and then proceeded into the heavy intensity exercise domain for 8-minutes before returning to a reduced wattage to cool down for 3 minutes. We utilized a metabolic cart along with an ERG bike and a standardized value of 0.45g/kg of mass of ketones to conduct our research. The research shows that the effects of a 0.45g/kg supplementation can vary in comparison to the placebo with regards to its effects on oxygen uptake and muscle metabolism.