Presentation Title

Revisiting the Taboo of Regifting: A Replication Study

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Many people have been in the position of receiving a gift that is either unwanted or better suited for someone else. An option would be to regift the item, but there is a stigma surrounding regifting, and is it worse than throwing something away? This study will be conducted to understand where the negative emotions associated with regifting arise from. We seek to replicate previous research by Adams et al. (2012) on the effects of regifting versus throwing an unwanted gift away, on perceived level of offensiveness. We shall recruit 176 participants via social media to complete an online survey where participants will be randomly assigned to take the perspective of a giver or a receiver of a gift. They will read a scenario where the gift, a wristwatch, is either regifted or destroyed. Participants will rate how offensive the outcome is, given their perspective (either as the giver or the receiver of the gift). Based on findings by Adams et al. (2012), we predict participants will view destroying gifts as worse than regifting them. Specifically, we predict that givers will perceive destroying gifts as more offensive than regifting, whereas receivers will perceive regifting and destroying gifts as equivalent. The findings of our research may aid consumers in both saving money and reducing their ecological footprints through regifting. Future research should consider the emotions associated with regifting from a developmental perspective, as givers’ and receivers’ views on regifting may change as children develop theory of mind.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Catherine Ortner

Comments

Note: Authorship was listed in reverse alphabetical order. However, each student assisted with the project in an equal amount and credit for this presentation is spread equally between each of the students. Thanks to Dr. Catherine Ortner for assisting us with this project.

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Revisiting the Taboo of Regifting: A Replication Study

Many people have been in the position of receiving a gift that is either unwanted or better suited for someone else. An option would be to regift the item, but there is a stigma surrounding regifting, and is it worse than throwing something away? This study will be conducted to understand where the negative emotions associated with regifting arise from. We seek to replicate previous research by Adams et al. (2012) on the effects of regifting versus throwing an unwanted gift away, on perceived level of offensiveness. We shall recruit 176 participants via social media to complete an online survey where participants will be randomly assigned to take the perspective of a giver or a receiver of a gift. They will read a scenario where the gift, a wristwatch, is either regifted or destroyed. Participants will rate how offensive the outcome is, given their perspective (either as the giver or the receiver of the gift). Based on findings by Adams et al. (2012), we predict participants will view destroying gifts as worse than regifting them. Specifically, we predict that givers will perceive destroying gifts as more offensive than regifting, whereas receivers will perceive regifting and destroying gifts as equivalent. The findings of our research may aid consumers in both saving money and reducing their ecological footprints through regifting. Future research should consider the emotions associated with regifting from a developmental perspective, as givers’ and receivers’ views on regifting may change as children develop theory of mind.