Presentation Title

Zero Waste Sushi Shelter

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Jennifer J. RevelFollow

Abstract

The Zero Waste Sushi Shelter was created in response to a project in a Visual Arts Sculpture/Intermedia course that asked students to imagine and create a maquette of a personal shelter. “Maquette” is a visual arts term describing a model for a larger sculpture whose purpose is to visualize how the sculpture might look, and to work out approaches and materials for how it might be made.

The artist challenged herself to design a maquette whose materials embodied a Zero Waste sustainability model both in terms of reusing discarded products and not using further financial resources. This project, elevated on recycled chopsticks, or otemoto, was inspired by the resemblance of take-out sushi packaging -- the tray and lid -- to a display cabinet, or a “vitrine." The hinged glass cover allows viewers to imagine how a change in scale encourages exploration of concepts of elevated housing. An otemoto and bamboo frame also supports a Japanese-styled futon. The artist decided that a framework might be constructed out of chopsticks, and collaborated with the Sustainability Office to collect waste chopsticks. In three days, fifty-eight chopsticks were collected, which provided the materials to create the maquette and bring increased awareness of the importance of local and global sustainability.

Department

English and Modern Languages

Faculty Advisor

Donald Lawrence

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Zero Waste Sushi Shelter

The Zero Waste Sushi Shelter was created in response to a project in a Visual Arts Sculpture/Intermedia course that asked students to imagine and create a maquette of a personal shelter. “Maquette” is a visual arts term describing a model for a larger sculpture whose purpose is to visualize how the sculpture might look, and to work out approaches and materials for how it might be made.

The artist challenged herself to design a maquette whose materials embodied a Zero Waste sustainability model both in terms of reusing discarded products and not using further financial resources. This project, elevated on recycled chopsticks, or otemoto, was inspired by the resemblance of take-out sushi packaging -- the tray and lid -- to a display cabinet, or a “vitrine." The hinged glass cover allows viewers to imagine how a change in scale encourages exploration of concepts of elevated housing. An otemoto and bamboo frame also supports a Japanese-styled futon. The artist decided that a framework might be constructed out of chopsticks, and collaborated with the Sustainability Office to collect waste chopsticks. In three days, fifty-eight chopsticks were collected, which provided the materials to create the maquette and bring increased awareness of the importance of local and global sustainability.