Presentation Title

Analysis of fMRI Brain Activity for the Localization of the Quiet Eye

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Nicholas T. J. AlcantaraFollow

Abstract

Abstract: The quiet eye (QE) is defined as a period of fixated gaze (within 1 degree of visual angle and at least 100ms in duration) on a target before a movement is initiated. Previous research has positively correlated a longer quiet eye duration (QED) in the performance of expert athletes compared to novices during aiming tasks with more successful outcomes in performance and increased task complexity. Previous researchers have also proposed brain areas that are thought to be involved in the QE. This is the first study that has investigated the neural mechanisms of the QED using fMRI techniques in expert and novice participants. The aim of this research is to analyse previously collected fMRI data of 19 participants (9 archers, 10 non-archers). The participants performed a computer archery task using a joystick to aim and shoot at a target on a screen in high and low noise conditions in order to examine differences in QED in varying task complexity. Participants also tracked a cross hair with the joystick to obtain non-QE baseline brain activity. Analysis of fMRI data was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) 12 in MATLAB. The fMRI contrasts will be made between high and low noise conditions of experts and novices as well as comparing brain activity in experts vs. novices.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Claudia Gonzalez

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Analysis of fMRI Brain Activity for the Localization of the Quiet Eye

Abstract: The quiet eye (QE) is defined as a period of fixated gaze (within 1 degree of visual angle and at least 100ms in duration) on a target before a movement is initiated. Previous research has positively correlated a longer quiet eye duration (QED) in the performance of expert athletes compared to novices during aiming tasks with more successful outcomes in performance and increased task complexity. Previous researchers have also proposed brain areas that are thought to be involved in the QE. This is the first study that has investigated the neural mechanisms of the QED using fMRI techniques in expert and novice participants. The aim of this research is to analyse previously collected fMRI data of 19 participants (9 archers, 10 non-archers). The participants performed a computer archery task using a joystick to aim and shoot at a target on a screen in high and low noise conditions in order to examine differences in QED in varying task complexity. Participants also tracked a cross hair with the joystick to obtain non-QE baseline brain activity. Analysis of fMRI data was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) 12 in MATLAB. The fMRI contrasts will be made between high and low noise conditions of experts and novices as well as comparing brain activity in experts vs. novices.