Presentation Title

Emotion Control Beliefs as a Predictor of Emotion Regulation in Daily Life

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Pia PennekampFollow

Abstract

Being able to control emotions is associated with better mental health, well-being, and psychosocial functioning (De Castella et al., 2013; Bonanno & Burton, 2013; Aldao & Nolen-Hoeksema, 2010, 2012). Research has shown that emotion malleability beliefs (the extent to which one believes emotions are fixed or can be changed) influence choices of specific emotion regulation strategies (Kneeland et al., 2016). As part of a larger study on the predictors of emotion regulation in everyday life, we assessed the role of emotion malleability beliefs in the choice of several emotion regulation strategies across multiple events over multiple days. Ninety-seven participants completed a questionnaire assessing malleability beliefs before responding to 7-10 days of assessments on their mobile device (up to 6 assessments a day). Each assessment comprised 30 items, including items assessing how much participants engaged in each of nine emotion regulation strategies in response to a recent negative event. We found no overall associations between malleability beliefs and the use of adaptive and maladaptive strategies, r= 0.163, n.s.and r= -0.047, n.s. Analyses of individual strategies indicated that the more participants believed they could change their emotions, the more likely they were to use distraction, r= .222, p= 0.05, and the less likely they were to use learned helplessness, r = -.339, p= 0.01. Future research should examine the variability in malleability beliefs across different occasions and how emotion malleability beliefs interact with other predictors to predict emotion regulation.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Catherine Ortner

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Emotion Control Beliefs as a Predictor of Emotion Regulation in Daily Life

Being able to control emotions is associated with better mental health, well-being, and psychosocial functioning (De Castella et al., 2013; Bonanno & Burton, 2013; Aldao & Nolen-Hoeksema, 2010, 2012). Research has shown that emotion malleability beliefs (the extent to which one believes emotions are fixed or can be changed) influence choices of specific emotion regulation strategies (Kneeland et al., 2016). As part of a larger study on the predictors of emotion regulation in everyday life, we assessed the role of emotion malleability beliefs in the choice of several emotion regulation strategies across multiple events over multiple days. Ninety-seven participants completed a questionnaire assessing malleability beliefs before responding to 7-10 days of assessments on their mobile device (up to 6 assessments a day). Each assessment comprised 30 items, including items assessing how much participants engaged in each of nine emotion regulation strategies in response to a recent negative event. We found no overall associations between malleability beliefs and the use of adaptive and maladaptive strategies, r= 0.163, n.s.and r= -0.047, n.s. Analyses of individual strategies indicated that the more participants believed they could change their emotions, the more likely they were to use distraction, r= .222, p= 0.05, and the less likely they were to use learned helplessness, r = -.339, p= 0.01. Future research should examine the variability in malleability beliefs across different occasions and how emotion malleability beliefs interact with other predictors to predict emotion regulation.