Presentation Title

Reappraisal Tactic Use in Response to Regret and Disappointment

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Lindsay E. BamfordFollow

Abstract

Reappraisal is an emotion regulation strategy that involves changing the way one thinks about a situation (McRae et al., 2012). Reappraisal can take many forms. The effectiveness of reappraisal may depend on the context and the reappraisal tactic employed (McRae, et al., 2012). In our study, we assessed whether people would use different reappraisal tactics in response to events that elicit disappointment and regret.

We trained 50 participants in reappraisal. They subsequently played a gambling task which induced regret (after a loss in which participants see a better outcome had the other choice been made: complete feedback) and disappointment (after a loss in which participants only see the outcome of their choice: partial feedback; Coricelli et al., 2005). Participants reappraised after every loss. Reappraisals were coded using a system that recognizes eight kinds of reappraisal (McRae, et al., 2012).

We found no differences in the tactics used under conditions of disappointment and regret. The most frequently used tactic was acceptance followed by distancing. Our results contrast those found by McRae et al. (2012) in which the most commonly used tactic was change current circumstances followed by reality challenge. However, McRae et al. (2012) induced negative emotion using photographs and, in our study, we used a game. Although the results suggest that the types of reappraisals used while experiencing regret and disappointment do not vary, this remains to be replicated in other experiments that vary distinct emotions.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Catherine Ortner

Comments

I am submitting two poster presentations so please schedule them for different times.

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Reappraisal Tactic Use in Response to Regret and Disappointment

Reappraisal is an emotion regulation strategy that involves changing the way one thinks about a situation (McRae et al., 2012). Reappraisal can take many forms. The effectiveness of reappraisal may depend on the context and the reappraisal tactic employed (McRae, et al., 2012). In our study, we assessed whether people would use different reappraisal tactics in response to events that elicit disappointment and regret.

We trained 50 participants in reappraisal. They subsequently played a gambling task which induced regret (after a loss in which participants see a better outcome had the other choice been made: complete feedback) and disappointment (after a loss in which participants only see the outcome of their choice: partial feedback; Coricelli et al., 2005). Participants reappraised after every loss. Reappraisals were coded using a system that recognizes eight kinds of reappraisal (McRae, et al., 2012).

We found no differences in the tactics used under conditions of disappointment and regret. The most frequently used tactic was acceptance followed by distancing. Our results contrast those found by McRae et al. (2012) in which the most commonly used tactic was change current circumstances followed by reality challenge. However, McRae et al. (2012) induced negative emotion using photographs and, in our study, we used a game. Although the results suggest that the types of reappraisals used while experiencing regret and disappointment do not vary, this remains to be replicated in other experiments that vary distinct emotions.