Presentation Title

Interactome of Two Fermenting Yeast Species During Beer Production

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Breanne McAmmondFollow

Abstract

Parallel 49 Brewing Company opened in East Vancouver in 2012 and has become an award-winning microbrewery central to the growing beer culture in British Columbia. One of their most successful beers is brewed with a co-culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Brettanomyces claussenii using a fairly complex and laborious process to achieve a unique flavour profile; however, due to the time and energy expenses required to produce this beer, production has been halted. At present, Parallel 49 critically needs information regarding this unique brew in order to: understand the genetic makeup of these two strains; characterize the metabolites produced by the individual strains in relation to their gene expression profiles; and understand how yeast strains genetically and metabolically interact during mixed-strain fermentations. To achieve these goals, the genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiles of each yeast species are being characterized independently and in co-culture during fermentation of wort into beer. Measures of fermentation progress, specifically decreasing oxygen, pH and specific gravity, as well as increasing ethanol content, show that Brettanomyces works at a much slower rate than Saccharomyces cerevisiae or co-cultures of the two. The rate of flavour compound production, as measured by headspace gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector, differed in each yeast culture. By gaining an understanding of underlying biological processes, Parallel 49 will be able to identify key biochemical pathways that lead to the flavour profile of this popular brew. As advances in brewing sciences are made, the company will hopefully be able to tailor their brewing process to allow for use a single yeast species to make a similar product more efficiently.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Jonathan Van Hamme

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Interactome of Two Fermenting Yeast Species During Beer Production

Parallel 49 Brewing Company opened in East Vancouver in 2012 and has become an award-winning microbrewery central to the growing beer culture in British Columbia. One of their most successful beers is brewed with a co-culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Brettanomyces claussenii using a fairly complex and laborious process to achieve a unique flavour profile; however, due to the time and energy expenses required to produce this beer, production has been halted. At present, Parallel 49 critically needs information regarding this unique brew in order to: understand the genetic makeup of these two strains; characterize the metabolites produced by the individual strains in relation to their gene expression profiles; and understand how yeast strains genetically and metabolically interact during mixed-strain fermentations. To achieve these goals, the genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiles of each yeast species are being characterized independently and in co-culture during fermentation of wort into beer. Measures of fermentation progress, specifically decreasing oxygen, pH and specific gravity, as well as increasing ethanol content, show that Brettanomyces works at a much slower rate than Saccharomyces cerevisiae or co-cultures of the two. The rate of flavour compound production, as measured by headspace gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector, differed in each yeast culture. By gaining an understanding of underlying biological processes, Parallel 49 will be able to identify key biochemical pathways that lead to the flavour profile of this popular brew. As advances in brewing sciences are made, the company will hopefully be able to tailor their brewing process to allow for use a single yeast species to make a similar product more efficiently.