Presentation Title

Improving Methods to Predict Cardiovascular Disease in Asymptomatic People

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Emily VilacFollow

Abstract

In this study, hyperemic velocity and change in arterial diameter after varying periods of occlusion of the brachial and popliteal arteries will be measured with ultrasound in both active and non-active populations. Custom-designed software will then be used to generate a numeric index that will be clinically useful in assessing vascular health and predicting cardiac events such as heart attack. As the most suitable parameter for predicting cardiovascular risk is yet to be determined, this study will focus specifically on hyperemic velocity. This aspect is directly dependent on endothelial function, a key indicator of vascular health. This will be the first study to systematically use different durations of occlusion to determine a relationship with hyperemic responses across populations. In doing so, clinical techniques of analyzing endothelial function as a means of assessing vascular health will be optimized, ensuring a more comfortable process for patients.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

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Improving Methods to Predict Cardiovascular Disease in Asymptomatic People

In this study, hyperemic velocity and change in arterial diameter after varying periods of occlusion of the brachial and popliteal arteries will be measured with ultrasound in both active and non-active populations. Custom-designed software will then be used to generate a numeric index that will be clinically useful in assessing vascular health and predicting cardiac events such as heart attack. As the most suitable parameter for predicting cardiovascular risk is yet to be determined, this study will focus specifically on hyperemic velocity. This aspect is directly dependent on endothelial function, a key indicator of vascular health. This will be the first study to systematically use different durations of occlusion to determine a relationship with hyperemic responses across populations. In doing so, clinical techniques of analyzing endothelial function as a means of assessing vascular health will be optimized, ensuring a more comfortable process for patients.