Presentation Title

Characterization of the Antimicrobial Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Cave-Dwelling Streptomyces ICC1 Strain

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Alysha E. MilwardFollow

Abstract

The progression of antibiotic resistant microorganisms has greatly hindered today’s antimicrobial agents that were once revolutionary developments. No longer a battle mankind can win with commercially available pharmaceutical antibiotics, the microbial products from various organisms are being extensively studied for potentially better and more effective antimicrobial properties to be used as an alternative. This study examines the secondary metabolites produced by the cave-dwelling Streptomyces ICC1 strain which exhibits these desired antimicrobial properties against strains of laboratory and multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and laboratory and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Following optimization methods, the Streptomyces ICC1 strain was grown at a temperature of 15°C in nutrient broth culture on an orbital shaking incubator at 150rpm. The Streptomyces ICC1 broth culture consistently displayed a brown pigmentation after five days of incubation, indicative of secondary metabolite production. Bioassays were performed via the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method after extraction of the secondary metabolites, with organic solvents and water, to determine the relative polarity/hydrophilicity of the antimicrobial compound(s). Bioactivity was consistently observed in the organic layer of diethyl ether-water extractions and the aqueous layer of octanol-water extractions. In future work, the bioactive secondary metabolites will be separated via high performance liquid chromatography, and structurally analyzed via 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

Department

Other

Physical Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Heidi Huttunen-Hennelly

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Characterization of the Antimicrobial Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Cave-Dwelling Streptomyces ICC1 Strain

The progression of antibiotic resistant microorganisms has greatly hindered today’s antimicrobial agents that were once revolutionary developments. No longer a battle mankind can win with commercially available pharmaceutical antibiotics, the microbial products from various organisms are being extensively studied for potentially better and more effective antimicrobial properties to be used as an alternative. This study examines the secondary metabolites produced by the cave-dwelling Streptomyces ICC1 strain which exhibits these desired antimicrobial properties against strains of laboratory and multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and laboratory and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Following optimization methods, the Streptomyces ICC1 strain was grown at a temperature of 15°C in nutrient broth culture on an orbital shaking incubator at 150rpm. The Streptomyces ICC1 broth culture consistently displayed a brown pigmentation after five days of incubation, indicative of secondary metabolite production. Bioassays were performed via the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method after extraction of the secondary metabolites, with organic solvents and water, to determine the relative polarity/hydrophilicity of the antimicrobial compound(s). Bioactivity was consistently observed in the organic layer of diethyl ether-water extractions and the aqueous layer of octanol-water extractions. In future work, the bioactive secondary metabolites will be separated via high performance liquid chromatography, and structurally analyzed via 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.