Presentation Title

Determination of Parabens in Mouthwash by Capillary Electrophoresis

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Parabens have been used in the beauty industry for their antimicrobial effects. There has been some push-back as parabens have been found inside human breast tumors and as such they are now controlled or banned in certain countries. It has been known that parabens, when exposed to singlet oxygen, can produce hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquione, which can cause damage to the skin or hair. It has been found that shampoos, which contain parabens, are the leading cause for parabens to be accumulated in the body. One of the many reasons that this should be analyzed is that paraben has been known to bind to human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin, both of which are found in the plasma of blood and are used to carry drugs through the body. If these sites are binded to, these drugs become less effective. This study employs capillary electrophoresis to analyze the content of household mouthwashes, as they are marketed to help keep the mouth clean and reduce bacteria or whiten teeth. There are typically 4 parabens used for their antimicrobial effects (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butylparaben). Only 3 were analyzed, (methyl, propyl, and butyl), as ethylparaben is only found within the food industry. These mouthwashes were analyzed quantitatively to identify which parabens were found within the mouthwash, and then were quantified to idnetify which parabens were in higher concentration. The paraben within the samples were then identified using the spike method. The method was then verified, and the detection limits and precision were evaluated. Expired mouthwashes were also analyzed to find any correlations between expired and non-expired mouthwashes.

Department

Chemistry

Faculty Advisor

Kingsley Donkor & Sharon Brewer

Comments

Would like to present as well at UBCO on March 30, 2019

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Determination of Parabens in Mouthwash by Capillary Electrophoresis

Parabens have been used in the beauty industry for their antimicrobial effects. There has been some push-back as parabens have been found inside human breast tumors and as such they are now controlled or banned in certain countries. It has been known that parabens, when exposed to singlet oxygen, can produce hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquione, which can cause damage to the skin or hair. It has been found that shampoos, which contain parabens, are the leading cause for parabens to be accumulated in the body. One of the many reasons that this should be analyzed is that paraben has been known to bind to human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin, both of which are found in the plasma of blood and are used to carry drugs through the body. If these sites are binded to, these drugs become less effective. This study employs capillary electrophoresis to analyze the content of household mouthwashes, as they are marketed to help keep the mouth clean and reduce bacteria or whiten teeth. There are typically 4 parabens used for their antimicrobial effects (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butylparaben). Only 3 were analyzed, (methyl, propyl, and butyl), as ethylparaben is only found within the food industry. These mouthwashes were analyzed quantitatively to identify which parabens were found within the mouthwash, and then were quantified to idnetify which parabens were in higher concentration. The paraben within the samples were then identified using the spike method. The method was then verified, and the detection limits and precision were evaluated. Expired mouthwashes were also analyzed to find any correlations between expired and non-expired mouthwashes.