Presentation Title

Plant Community Recovery One Year Post Fire in Interior Douglas Fir Forests in Areas of Different Burn Severity

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Presenter Information

Hailey MankeFollow

Abstract

The province of British Columbia, Canada, had an unprecedented fire season in 2017 with over 1.2 million hectares burned. Crown land comprises 94% of the provincial land base and numerous licensees such as forestry companies and ranchers rely on the use of crown land. Post-wildfire recovery is extremely important economically, socially and ecologically to the province. Due to the reduction in forage, ranchers are not able to utilize their grazing tenures allocated by the provincial government in burned areas for an undetermined amount of time. This comes at a high cost to ranchers as they rely on the relatively inexpensive forage supplied by crown land during the growing season. It is important to understand the recovery of the plant communities’ post-wildfire so that there is enough time for the plant community to recover, but also so that cattle can return to the range as soon as possible to minimize the economic impact on the ranching industry. Plant communities present one-year post-wildfire in the IDFxh2 biogeoclimatic ecosystem classification zone were examined at three different locations in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Two locations were within the Elephant Hill Fire and one was located within the Martin Mountain Fire. At each location six randomly selected sites were sampled, two in each burn severity rating of low, moderate and high respectively. Data collection included modified Daubenmire transects and bio-mass clippings. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS software. It was determined that the plant communities one-year post-wildfire did differ in areas of different burn severity. This information will help support resource managers' decisions on post-wildfire recovery strategies in the future and influence when cattle are able to return to graze on crown lands impacted by fire.

Department

Natural Resource Science

Faculty Advisor

Wendy Gardner

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Plant Community Recovery One Year Post Fire in Interior Douglas Fir Forests in Areas of Different Burn Severity

The province of British Columbia, Canada, had an unprecedented fire season in 2017 with over 1.2 million hectares burned. Crown land comprises 94% of the provincial land base and numerous licensees such as forestry companies and ranchers rely on the use of crown land. Post-wildfire recovery is extremely important economically, socially and ecologically to the province. Due to the reduction in forage, ranchers are not able to utilize their grazing tenures allocated by the provincial government in burned areas for an undetermined amount of time. This comes at a high cost to ranchers as they rely on the relatively inexpensive forage supplied by crown land during the growing season. It is important to understand the recovery of the plant communities’ post-wildfire so that there is enough time for the plant community to recover, but also so that cattle can return to the range as soon as possible to minimize the economic impact on the ranching industry. Plant communities present one-year post-wildfire in the IDFxh2 biogeoclimatic ecosystem classification zone were examined at three different locations in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Two locations were within the Elephant Hill Fire and one was located within the Martin Mountain Fire. At each location six randomly selected sites were sampled, two in each burn severity rating of low, moderate and high respectively. Data collection included modified Daubenmire transects and bio-mass clippings. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS software. It was determined that the plant communities one-year post-wildfire did differ in areas of different burn severity. This information will help support resource managers' decisions on post-wildfire recovery strategies in the future and influence when cattle are able to return to graze on crown lands impacted by fire.