Presentation Title

Microplastics in Your Mussels? Isolation of Microplastic Particles from the Mussel Mytilus trossulus from the Eastern, Southern, and Western Coasts of Vancouver Island

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1008

Start Date

24-3-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

24-3-2018 4:15 PM

Abstract

Small (Mytilus trossulusfrom the Eastern, Southern, and Western coasts of Vancouver Island. We wanted to find if different quantities and qualities of microplastics were present in mussels with relation to community population and coastal orientation. To do this, mussels were taken from twelve sites along the Eastern, Southern, and Western coasts of Vancouver Island. Ten mussels with shell lengths between 3-4cm were taken from each site, and each mussel’s soft tissue was digested in Nitric Acid (HNO3) using refined methodologies. Tissue digestion was done to remove organic tissue without altering any non-tissue materials (plastic). Tissue solutions were filtered through a 0.47micron filter, and the debris remaining on the filter was examined under a dissecting scope. Particles found were confirmed and recorded by type (fragment or fiber) and color (white, black, brown, red, yellow, or blue).

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Louis Gosselin

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Mar 24th, 4:00 PM Mar 24th, 4:15 PM

Microplastics in Your Mussels? Isolation of Microplastic Particles from the Mussel Mytilus trossulus from the Eastern, Southern, and Western Coasts of Vancouver Island

IB 1008

Small (Mytilus trossulusfrom the Eastern, Southern, and Western coasts of Vancouver Island. We wanted to find if different quantities and qualities of microplastics were present in mussels with relation to community population and coastal orientation. To do this, mussels were taken from twelve sites along the Eastern, Southern, and Western coasts of Vancouver Island. Ten mussels with shell lengths between 3-4cm were taken from each site, and each mussel’s soft tissue was digested in Nitric Acid (HNO3) using refined methodologies. Tissue digestion was done to remove organic tissue without altering any non-tissue materials (plastic). Tissue solutions were filtered through a 0.47micron filter, and the debris remaining on the filter was examined under a dissecting scope. Particles found were confirmed and recorded by type (fragment or fiber) and color (white, black, brown, red, yellow, or blue).