Presentation Title

The Move Back to the City and the Ripple Effect: Gentrification, and Social Housing

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1015

Start Date

24-3-2018 4:30 PM

End Date

24-3-2018 4:45 PM

Abstract

Housing is one of the most fundamental needs for human survival and yet it is one of the most debated among all levels of government, the public sector and among scholars. As cities began to sprawl in the 1940s and 50s, and through the process of filtering, cities experienced a massive movement of their middle-class populations to the new promise land of suburbia. The dwellings they left behind near the inner-city were generally taken over by working class populations who were looking to better their housing situations. With time, middle-class populations also followed their predecessors to the suburbs, leaving behind the working poor, racial minorities and new immigrants. Starting in the 1970s, a back-to-the-city movement called gentrification occurred. Gentrification is characterized by the restoration of old run down inner city homes for the well-to-do. This started a new wave of investment near the city cores. This latest phase of urban development has led to the displacement of low-income earners from their traditional places of residence. Drawing from the vast bank of urban geography literature, this research explores the impact of gentrification on the growing homelessness problems within North American cities. It also looks at the roles and responsibilities that different levels of government and the public sector play in finding solutions to this problem.

Department

Geography and Environmental Studies

Faculty Advisor

Gilles Viaud

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Mar 24th, 4:30 PM Mar 24th, 4:45 PM

The Move Back to the City and the Ripple Effect: Gentrification, and Social Housing

IB 1015

Housing is one of the most fundamental needs for human survival and yet it is one of the most debated among all levels of government, the public sector and among scholars. As cities began to sprawl in the 1940s and 50s, and through the process of filtering, cities experienced a massive movement of their middle-class populations to the new promise land of suburbia. The dwellings they left behind near the inner-city were generally taken over by working class populations who were looking to better their housing situations. With time, middle-class populations also followed their predecessors to the suburbs, leaving behind the working poor, racial minorities and new immigrants. Starting in the 1970s, a back-to-the-city movement called gentrification occurred. Gentrification is characterized by the restoration of old run down inner city homes for the well-to-do. This started a new wave of investment near the city cores. This latest phase of urban development has led to the displacement of low-income earners from their traditional places of residence. Drawing from the vast bank of urban geography literature, this research explores the impact of gentrification on the growing homelessness problems within North American cities. It also looks at the roles and responsibilities that different levels of government and the public sector play in finding solutions to this problem.