Presentation Title

Uncovering the Metabolomic Fingerprint of Exercise-Derived Platelet Microvesicles

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1015

Start Date

24-3-2018 4:15 PM

End Date

24-3-2018 4:30 PM

Abstract

Microvesicles (MVs) are lipid-enclosed vesicles that bleb off the plasma membrane of various cells when subject to chemical or physical stressors. These MVs range from 0.1 μm to 1.0 μm and are implicated in many important processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis through the transfer of cargo from cell to cell. MV origins are diverse but, in circulation, approximately 70% are of platelet origin. Recent research suggests that high-intensity exercise is linked to an increase of platelet microvesiculation and enhanced cell behaviours that mimic angiogenesis in vitro. Many proteins and other transcripts have been found as platelet microvesicle (PMV) cargo but the metabolites in PMVs have not been extensively studied. Exercise may perturb the metabolites within platelets and consequently modify the metabolomic fingerprint of PMVs. This study aims to identify metabolite changes that may exist between PMVs obtained at rest and those after a bout of high intensity exercise. To assess this profile, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (Bruker 500 MHz using 1D 1H NMR and 2D 1H-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY)) was used to assess the metabolic profile from PMV obtained before and after 45 minutes of high intensity exercise in ten participants. The chemical shifts and correlations of protons in the NMR spectra were queried in the human metabolome database (HMDB), giving a percentage probability of metabolites in the samples. Future research can focus on which biochemical pathways these metabolites will be shunted through, providing a better understanding of the link between exercise and PMV function.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

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Mar 24th, 4:15 PM Mar 24th, 4:30 PM

Uncovering the Metabolomic Fingerprint of Exercise-Derived Platelet Microvesicles

IB 1015

Microvesicles (MVs) are lipid-enclosed vesicles that bleb off the plasma membrane of various cells when subject to chemical or physical stressors. These MVs range from 0.1 μm to 1.0 μm and are implicated in many important processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis through the transfer of cargo from cell to cell. MV origins are diverse but, in circulation, approximately 70% are of platelet origin. Recent research suggests that high-intensity exercise is linked to an increase of platelet microvesiculation and enhanced cell behaviours that mimic angiogenesis in vitro. Many proteins and other transcripts have been found as platelet microvesicle (PMV) cargo but the metabolites in PMVs have not been extensively studied. Exercise may perturb the metabolites within platelets and consequently modify the metabolomic fingerprint of PMVs. This study aims to identify metabolite changes that may exist between PMVs obtained at rest and those after a bout of high intensity exercise. To assess this profile, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (Bruker 500 MHz using 1D 1H NMR and 2D 1H-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY)) was used to assess the metabolic profile from PMV obtained before and after 45 minutes of high intensity exercise in ten participants. The chemical shifts and correlations of protons in the NMR spectra were queried in the human metabolome database (HMDB), giving a percentage probability of metabolites in the samples. Future research can focus on which biochemical pathways these metabolites will be shunted through, providing a better understanding of the link between exercise and PMV function.