Presentation Title

Feminist Stand Point Theory, Marginalization & Cerebral Palsy: A Personal Narrative

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1008

Start Date

24-3-2018 3:05 PM

End Date

24-3-2018 3:25 PM

Abstract

Feminist Standpoint Theory contends a) knowledge is socially situated, b) the marginalized are uniquely placed to pose questions that non-marginalized would not be able to ask and that 3) research with an emphasis on power relations begins with the marginalized. A currently broader viewpoint exists that expands its notions of inclusion beyond women to include men and the physically disadvantaged. This research explores the standpoint of being physically challenged, and the methods through which Stand Point Theory allow a lifetime of knowledge to be given weight, substance, and authority that would not otherwise be available through other philosophic lens. This in turn would bring into sharper focus the experience of being ‘The Other’ while being both inside and outside cultural accessibility. It would also necessitate the need for those taking Stand Point Theory on board to account for the criticisms of privilege that the removal or lessening of barriers to successful admittance affords. This becomes particularly weighted with more relevance when confronted with the differences in degrees of acceptable access between perceived physical challenges verses unseen psychological challenges and the unfortunate stigmas and assumptions that it creates between the two of them. The goal, then, is to transcend mere memoir: allowing those whom physical and psychological challenges did not affect from birth to see and feel the world through this personal, interpretive, ongoing narrative.

Department

Philosophy

Faculty Advisor

Jenna Woodrow

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Mar 24th, 3:05 PM Mar 24th, 3:25 PM

Feminist Stand Point Theory, Marginalization & Cerebral Palsy: A Personal Narrative

IB 1008

Feminist Standpoint Theory contends a) knowledge is socially situated, b) the marginalized are uniquely placed to pose questions that non-marginalized would not be able to ask and that 3) research with an emphasis on power relations begins with the marginalized. A currently broader viewpoint exists that expands its notions of inclusion beyond women to include men and the physically disadvantaged. This research explores the standpoint of being physically challenged, and the methods through which Stand Point Theory allow a lifetime of knowledge to be given weight, substance, and authority that would not otherwise be available through other philosophic lens. This in turn would bring into sharper focus the experience of being ‘The Other’ while being both inside and outside cultural accessibility. It would also necessitate the need for those taking Stand Point Theory on board to account for the criticisms of privilege that the removal or lessening of barriers to successful admittance affords. This becomes particularly weighted with more relevance when confronted with the differences in degrees of acceptable access between perceived physical challenges verses unseen psychological challenges and the unfortunate stigmas and assumptions that it creates between the two of them. The goal, then, is to transcend mere memoir: allowing those whom physical and psychological challenges did not affect from birth to see and feel the world through this personal, interpretive, ongoing narrative.