Presentation Title

Female Gaze Times and Preferences of Online Dating Profiles

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1008

Start Date

24-3-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

24-3-2018 2:15 PM

Abstract

This study aims to corroborate research done on females’ online dating preferences and also determine if manipulating the variables of physical attractiveness, income, warmth and intelligence will affect how long heterosexual females will look at a male’s online dating profile. Participants will view 16 hypothetical male online dating profiles, rating potential interest in dating them for both a short- and long-term relationship while their eye movements are being monitored. We are hypothesizing that the manipulation of these variables will have a significant effect on the participants’ interest in dating the profile, as well as affect looking times. Specifically, we expect that gaze times will be longer for high levels of the variables, and shorter for low levels. Additional interactions between these variables and their impact on gaze times will also be explored.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Michael Woloszyn

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Mar 24th, 2:00 PM Mar 24th, 2:15 PM

Female Gaze Times and Preferences of Online Dating Profiles

IB 1008

This study aims to corroborate research done on females’ online dating preferences and also determine if manipulating the variables of physical attractiveness, income, warmth and intelligence will affect how long heterosexual females will look at a male’s online dating profile. Participants will view 16 hypothetical male online dating profiles, rating potential interest in dating them for both a short- and long-term relationship while their eye movements are being monitored. We are hypothesizing that the manipulation of these variables will have a significant effect on the participants’ interest in dating the profile, as well as affect looking times. Specifically, we expect that gaze times will be longer for high levels of the variables, and shorter for low levels. Additional interactions between these variables and their impact on gaze times will also be explored.