Presentation Title

Hiodon Rosei: Its Ecology and Life History at the McAbee Fossil Site

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1008

Start Date

24-3-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

24-3-2018 1:45 PM

Abstract

†Hiodon rosei (Hiodontidae, Hussakof 1916) is a prehistoric species of fish that is found in several fossil deposits throughout British Columbia and Washington State. It is related to the Mooneye (Hiodon tergisus) and the Goldeye (Hiodon alosoides) that still exist today east of the Rocky Mountains. Very little ecological research has been done on this species of fish since its discovery in 1916.It is one of the most common fish fossils found at the McAbee fossil deposit located roughly 60 km north-west of Kamloops and forms the majority of fish fossils in the TRU fossil collection. This research is directed at revealing some ecology and life history of Hiodon rosei by looking at the fossils in the TRU collection (supplemented with information from other collections) and assessing sex, size, and distribution of the fish in the McAbee site. Measurements will be used to discover relationships between the length of the fish and the size of other body parts in order to fill in missing data. Size-frequency graphs will be used to approximate the age of the fish fossils at their time of death. Finally, a review of the literature will be used to back up hypotheses and relate the ecology of the living species of the genus Hiodon to the extinct Hiodon rosei. This research will begin to fill a knowledge gap over 100 years in the making and will add to the local research being done at McAbee.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Rob Higgins

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 24th, 1:30 PM Mar 24th, 1:45 PM

Hiodon Rosei: Its Ecology and Life History at the McAbee Fossil Site

IB 1008

†Hiodon rosei (Hiodontidae, Hussakof 1916) is a prehistoric species of fish that is found in several fossil deposits throughout British Columbia and Washington State. It is related to the Mooneye (Hiodon tergisus) and the Goldeye (Hiodon alosoides) that still exist today east of the Rocky Mountains. Very little ecological research has been done on this species of fish since its discovery in 1916.It is one of the most common fish fossils found at the McAbee fossil deposit located roughly 60 km north-west of Kamloops and forms the majority of fish fossils in the TRU fossil collection. This research is directed at revealing some ecology and life history of Hiodon rosei by looking at the fossils in the TRU collection (supplemented with information from other collections) and assessing sex, size, and distribution of the fish in the McAbee site. Measurements will be used to discover relationships between the length of the fish and the size of other body parts in order to fill in missing data. Size-frequency graphs will be used to approximate the age of the fish fossils at their time of death. Finally, a review of the literature will be used to back up hypotheses and relate the ecology of the living species of the genus Hiodon to the extinct Hiodon rosei. This research will begin to fill a knowledge gap over 100 years in the making and will add to the local research being done at McAbee.