Presentation Title

Pacifism and Challenges to Liberty in Canada during the First World War

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

24-3-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

24-3-2018 2:15 PM

Abstract

The overall aim of my research has been to arrive at a better understanding of how beliefs and values shape, or fail to shape, how we act. A few of the key concepts I explored were pacifism, liberty, self, and conscience. Given the extent of the topic, I approached research in an interdisciplinary manner, drawing predominantly from the subjects of philosophy, psychology, religious studies, and history. In order to limit the scope of the project my research focused on a particular group of people during a particular time, namely, on Canadian pacifists during the First World War (WW1). Accordingly, my presentation will include a brief explanation of what is meant by pacifism, liberty, self, and conscience, an overview of pacifist activity in Canada during WW1, and a discussion on a few of the major theoretical constructs underlying person-centered therapy and their connection to aspects of pacifist moral theory. Ultimately I make the case that action in accord with conscience has both a social and psychological benefit.

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty Advisor

George Johnson

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Mar 24th, 2:00 PM Mar 24th, 2:15 PM

Pacifism and Challenges to Liberty in Canada during the First World War

IB 1020

The overall aim of my research has been to arrive at a better understanding of how beliefs and values shape, or fail to shape, how we act. A few of the key concepts I explored were pacifism, liberty, self, and conscience. Given the extent of the topic, I approached research in an interdisciplinary manner, drawing predominantly from the subjects of philosophy, psychology, religious studies, and history. In order to limit the scope of the project my research focused on a particular group of people during a particular time, namely, on Canadian pacifists during the First World War (WW1). Accordingly, my presentation will include a brief explanation of what is meant by pacifism, liberty, self, and conscience, an overview of pacifist activity in Canada during WW1, and a discussion on a few of the major theoretical constructs underlying person-centered therapy and their connection to aspects of pacifist moral theory. Ultimately I make the case that action in accord with conscience has both a social and psychological benefit.