Presentation Title

Simple Models Of A Complex Reality: The Academic Achievements And Evolution Of Chauncy Harris

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1014

Start Date

24-3-2018 1:50 PM

End Date

24-3-2018 2:10 PM

Abstract

Chauncy Harris was an urban geographer best known for his and Edward Ullman’s pivotal contribution to understanding the internal spatial patterns of cities, “The Nature of Cities”, published in 1945. Harris’s models are still reviewed in many urban geography classes, making him one of the most notable contributors to the discipline. He is attributed with helping thrust the study of geography from descriptive to empirical. The purpose of this presentation is to consider his academic achievements, and how his research evolved throughout his career. This is achieved through a literature review that includes articles written by Harris between 1942 and 2001, as well as articles written by various other contributors. This presentation also summarizes two of Harris’s seminal articles; first, “The Nature of Cities”, in which he and Ullman introduce his 3 ideographic models of the internal structure of cities, and second; “‘The Nature of Cities’ and Urban Geography in the Last Half Century”, in which he introduces his fourth model, the peripheral model. This presentation concludes that Harris’s four models and numerous other contributions to the field of urban geography make him a significant pioneer of the discipline.

Department

Geography and Environmental Studies

Faculty Advisor

Gilles Viaud

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Mar 24th, 1:50 PM Mar 24th, 2:10 PM

Simple Models Of A Complex Reality: The Academic Achievements And Evolution Of Chauncy Harris

IB 1014

Chauncy Harris was an urban geographer best known for his and Edward Ullman’s pivotal contribution to understanding the internal spatial patterns of cities, “The Nature of Cities”, published in 1945. Harris’s models are still reviewed in many urban geography classes, making him one of the most notable contributors to the discipline. He is attributed with helping thrust the study of geography from descriptive to empirical. The purpose of this presentation is to consider his academic achievements, and how his research evolved throughout his career. This is achieved through a literature review that includes articles written by Harris between 1942 and 2001, as well as articles written by various other contributors. This presentation also summarizes two of Harris’s seminal articles; first, “The Nature of Cities”, in which he and Ullman introduce his 3 ideographic models of the internal structure of cities, and second; “‘The Nature of Cities’ and Urban Geography in the Last Half Century”, in which he introduces his fourth model, the peripheral model. This presentation concludes that Harris’s four models and numerous other contributions to the field of urban geography make him a significant pioneer of the discipline.