Presentation Title

Adventure Tourism Legislation In Iceland

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1008

Start Date

24-3-2018 11:45 AM

End Date

24-3-2018 12:00 PM

Abstract

Adventure sport and adventure tourism are inherently dangerous. They offer an integral element of risk that attracts tourism clientele but also challenges companies and operators to determine how to properly mitigate said risk. This study aims to explore the way in which other countries and regions have implemented legal framework regulating commercial adventure tourism and the events that led to the need for those regulations.

Through interviews with adventure tourism experts and participants in Iceland, it became clear that there exists a precipitous situation within the industry. Currently, operators have no legal obligation to meet set minimum standards for their respective service or activities, they are not required to carry and maintain any specific certifications, and they are not subject to any form of safety auditing. To date, few accidents have been recorded nor have any accidents been devastating enough to capture the attention of a worldwide audience or Icelandic lawmakers.

This creates a false sense of security. Implementation of legislation that sets out framework and guidelines for commercial endeavours within the adventure tourism sector, much like those in other regions of the world, would help to mitigate the risks of adventure and safeguard the industry.

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty Advisor

Mark Wallin

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Mar 24th, 11:45 AM Mar 24th, 12:00 PM

Adventure Tourism Legislation In Iceland

IB 1008

Adventure sport and adventure tourism are inherently dangerous. They offer an integral element of risk that attracts tourism clientele but also challenges companies and operators to determine how to properly mitigate said risk. This study aims to explore the way in which other countries and regions have implemented legal framework regulating commercial adventure tourism and the events that led to the need for those regulations.

Through interviews with adventure tourism experts and participants in Iceland, it became clear that there exists a precipitous situation within the industry. Currently, operators have no legal obligation to meet set minimum standards for their respective service or activities, they are not required to carry and maintain any specific certifications, and they are not subject to any form of safety auditing. To date, few accidents have been recorded nor have any accidents been devastating enough to capture the attention of a worldwide audience or Icelandic lawmakers.

This creates a false sense of security. Implementation of legislation that sets out framework and guidelines for commercial endeavours within the adventure tourism sector, much like those in other regions of the world, would help to mitigate the risks of adventure and safeguard the industry.