Presentation Title

Populism and the Revival of Economic Nationalism in the United States

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

24-3-2018 11:45 AM

End Date

24-3-2018 12:00 PM

Abstract

Globalization is not present in all spheres of humanity and because it is not fully integrated, society is being confronted with some major issues. Globalization processes are present in economics through the global free-market economy, in social connectivity through technologies such as the Internet, and in the environmental issues we face as a planet like climate change. In the political sector, a promising global governance system has yet to be seriously suggested; however, it may be what is necessary to confront problems that stretch beyond national borders. A main concern stems from the negligence of transnational corporations (TNCs). TNCs act to maximize their profits, which brings economic insecurity to all nations working within the global economy, including developed nations.

In response to the economic effects of globalization, populist movements, such as economic nationalism, are experiencing a revival in politics. Some developing nations have responded to their insecurities by retreating from the global vision and turning their priorities back to protecting their nationhood. In the quest to ‘Make America Great Again’, populist Donald Trump based his campaign for president on a vision of economic nationalist reform to revive the American middle class. Trump’s intentions are questionable, as corporatization of the federal government seems to be reverting US policy in favour of the establishment. This presentation will examine populism in the context of the resurgence of economic nationalism in the US and discuss whether or not it could have any meaningful effect on the so-called winners and losers of neoliberal globalization.

Department

Political Studies

Faculty Advisor

Terry Kading

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Mar 24th, 11:45 AM Mar 24th, 12:00 PM

Populism and the Revival of Economic Nationalism in the United States

IB 1020

Globalization is not present in all spheres of humanity and because it is not fully integrated, society is being confronted with some major issues. Globalization processes are present in economics through the global free-market economy, in social connectivity through technologies such as the Internet, and in the environmental issues we face as a planet like climate change. In the political sector, a promising global governance system has yet to be seriously suggested; however, it may be what is necessary to confront problems that stretch beyond national borders. A main concern stems from the negligence of transnational corporations (TNCs). TNCs act to maximize their profits, which brings economic insecurity to all nations working within the global economy, including developed nations.

In response to the economic effects of globalization, populist movements, such as economic nationalism, are experiencing a revival in politics. Some developing nations have responded to their insecurities by retreating from the global vision and turning their priorities back to protecting their nationhood. In the quest to ‘Make America Great Again’, populist Donald Trump based his campaign for president on a vision of economic nationalist reform to revive the American middle class. Trump’s intentions are questionable, as corporatization of the federal government seems to be reverting US policy in favour of the establishment. This presentation will examine populism in the context of the resurgence of economic nationalism in the US and discuss whether or not it could have any meaningful effect on the so-called winners and losers of neoliberal globalization.