Presentation Title

Chauncy Harris: The Man Who Helped Shape Urban Geography

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented the Saturday of the conference

Location

IB 1008

Start Date

24-3-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

24-3-2018 10:30 AM

Abstract

Over the past seventy-five years, major economic, societal, and technological changes have contributed in reshaping North American cities. Population growth, sprawl, gentrification, and changing perception of the role cities play in modern society are only some of the transformations researchers experienced. In 1945, Chauncy Harris - an urban geography pioneer- along with his colleague Edward Ullman published “The nature of cities”, a seminal article that introduced geographers to several models and theories related to the changing form of cities. Since its publication, the article has been the most cited and the most influential of all the urban studies literature. In this paper, I propose a critical review of Harris’ extensive contributions, spanning over half a century, towards our understanding of urban change and to the field of urban geography.

Department

Geography and Environmental Studies

Faculty Advisor

Gilles Viaud

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Mar 24th, 10:15 AM Mar 24th, 10:30 AM

Chauncy Harris: The Man Who Helped Shape Urban Geography

IB 1008

Over the past seventy-five years, major economic, societal, and technological changes have contributed in reshaping North American cities. Population growth, sprawl, gentrification, and changing perception of the role cities play in modern society are only some of the transformations researchers experienced. In 1945, Chauncy Harris - an urban geography pioneer- along with his colleague Edward Ullman published “The nature of cities”, a seminal article that introduced geographers to several models and theories related to the changing form of cities. Since its publication, the article has been the most cited and the most influential of all the urban studies literature. In this paper, I propose a critical review of Harris’ extensive contributions, spanning over half a century, towards our understanding of urban change and to the field of urban geography.