Presentation Title

“Bee City”: A Comparison of Cultivated and Non-Cultivated Habitat for Native Pollinators in Kamloops

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Pollinators are a critical ecosystem service, although habitat loss due to urbanization is a primary factor contributing to pollinator declines. The purpose of this project was twofold: to determine the abundance of pollinators in gardens vs. natural, non-cultivated areas in Kamloops, and within these areas to determine if particular plant genera correlated with high pollinator diversity and abundance. With the collaboration of the Thompson-Shuswap Master Gardeners Association and local citizens, pollinators were surveyed in both cultivated gardens and non-cultivated, natural sites within Kamloops, BC. The results indicate that cultivated gardens within Kamloops support a greater numerical abundance of pollinators, especially during the months of July and August, than non-cultivated natural areas within the city. Given the increasing urbanization faced by many landscapes, the results of my research provide preliminary evidence identifying that while not necessarily supporting all native pollinators, appropriately planted urban landscapes may play an important role mitigating urbanization’s negative impact.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Lyn Baldwin

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

“Bee City”: A Comparison of Cultivated and Non-Cultivated Habitat for Native Pollinators in Kamloops

Pollinators are a critical ecosystem service, although habitat loss due to urbanization is a primary factor contributing to pollinator declines. The purpose of this project was twofold: to determine the abundance of pollinators in gardens vs. natural, non-cultivated areas in Kamloops, and within these areas to determine if particular plant genera correlated with high pollinator diversity and abundance. With the collaboration of the Thompson-Shuswap Master Gardeners Association and local citizens, pollinators were surveyed in both cultivated gardens and non-cultivated, natural sites within Kamloops, BC. The results indicate that cultivated gardens within Kamloops support a greater numerical abundance of pollinators, especially during the months of July and August, than non-cultivated natural areas within the city. Given the increasing urbanization faced by many landscapes, the results of my research provide preliminary evidence identifying that while not necessarily supporting all native pollinators, appropriately planted urban landscapes may play an important role mitigating urbanization’s negative impact.