Presentation Title

Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry for Soil Composition Analysis

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Synchrotron x-ray florescence spectrometry (XFS) at the Canada Light Source in Saskatoon, SK was used to analyze soil samples from the Kamloops area. The goal of the project was twofold. First, complete a statistical analysis on the use of XFS in order to determine optimal data collection sampling times. The data were then analyzed using standard software to associate peaks with elemental composition. Peak intensity determined by the software and peak intensity from the raw data were compared for different sampling times. Results show a linear relationship between peak intensity and sampling times for the more abundant elements; therefore acting as a primitive guide for sampling time depending on elements of interest. Second, compare XFS elemental analysis of the samples against analysis on the same soil samples via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Using the relative peak heights of the XFS data as a measure of relative abundance, correlations between the XFS and AAS data were examined. Results showed a poor correlation between both methods, which could be a result of a few factors. One of these factors could have been a lack of intermediary steps needed with the XFS data. Further research is needed as to why results did not correlate, and what future steps are needed to increase correlation.

Department

Physics

Faculty Advisor

Mark Paetkau

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Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry for Soil Composition Analysis

Synchrotron x-ray florescence spectrometry (XFS) at the Canada Light Source in Saskatoon, SK was used to analyze soil samples from the Kamloops area. The goal of the project was twofold. First, complete a statistical analysis on the use of XFS in order to determine optimal data collection sampling times. The data were then analyzed using standard software to associate peaks with elemental composition. Peak intensity determined by the software and peak intensity from the raw data were compared for different sampling times. Results show a linear relationship between peak intensity and sampling times for the more abundant elements; therefore acting as a primitive guide for sampling time depending on elements of interest. Second, compare XFS elemental analysis of the samples against analysis on the same soil samples via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Using the relative peak heights of the XFS data as a measure of relative abundance, correlations between the XFS and AAS data were examined. Results showed a poor correlation between both methods, which could be a result of a few factors. One of these factors could have been a lack of intermediary steps needed with the XFS data. Further research is needed as to why results did not correlate, and what future steps are needed to increase correlation.