Presentation Title

Reducing Disaster Vulnerability in the Rural-Urban Fringe

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Urban growth can often result in people and property moving to places where they will be at risk when disaster strikes. This research discusses how to apply improvements that boost the ability of a region to reduce its own vulnerability in the event of a disaster, to provide some sort of resilience to a neighboring region, and to reduce the difficulty of mobilizing support between two other regions. Our principal conclusions are that cost effective improvements can be made on the Rural-Urban Fringe to reduce vulnerability to disaster for a region. We further conclude that improvements in the RUF have positive impacts in adjacent areas. Our methods were based on literature review. We examine case studies such as the fires that have troubled many Australian communities, as well as the recent fires and related incidents in California. For each case study we discuss the policies that lead to losses, how city planners and policy makers have adapted since the incident occurred, and what still needs to be considered for future adaptations. Our results are a series of ideas, processes, and checklists that can be used by planners and stakeholders to develop disaster resilience.

Department

Geography and Environmental Studies

Faculty Advisor

Tom Waldichuk

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Reducing Disaster Vulnerability in the Rural-Urban Fringe

Urban growth can often result in people and property moving to places where they will be at risk when disaster strikes. This research discusses how to apply improvements that boost the ability of a region to reduce its own vulnerability in the event of a disaster, to provide some sort of resilience to a neighboring region, and to reduce the difficulty of mobilizing support between two other regions. Our principal conclusions are that cost effective improvements can be made on the Rural-Urban Fringe to reduce vulnerability to disaster for a region. We further conclude that improvements in the RUF have positive impacts in adjacent areas. Our methods were based on literature review. We examine case studies such as the fires that have troubled many Australian communities, as well as the recent fires and related incidents in California. For each case study we discuss the policies that lead to losses, how city planners and policy makers have adapted since the incident occurred, and what still needs to be considered for future adaptations. Our results are a series of ideas, processes, and checklists that can be used by planners and stakeholders to develop disaster resilience.