Presentation Title

Deciphering the Angiogenic MicroRNA Profile of Platelet-Derived Microvesicles

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Microvesicles (MV) are small spherical bodies released by various cell types, including platelets. Recent studies suggest these 100 nm to 1 μm membrane bound bodies can act as transport vehicles, delivering molecules, such as proteins, mRNA, and microRNA, to other cells. Platelet-derived MVs (PMVs) have been shown to transfer these molecules to endothelial cells (cells lining blood vessels), which may induce physiological effects. MicroRNA (miRNA), a type of non-coding RNA, acts as a post-translational regulator of protein expression and ultimately orchestrates many functions within cells. We speculate that if PMVs deliver miRNA to endothelial cells this may impact processes that lead to angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels. The aim of the present study was to investigate pro- and anti-angiogenic miRNA from PMVs obtained before and after high intensity exercise. Ten participants were recruited and performed high intensity exercise for 45 minutes and blood samples were collected. After isolation of MVs through serial centrifugation, the miRNA was isolated and reversed transcribed into complementary DNA (cDNA). The cDNA was amplified using real-time PCR, and Ct values were determined for 2 pro- and 2 anti-angiogenic miRNA. The Ct values were compared between pre- and post- exercise samples to determine whether exercise influences angiogenic miRNA expression. The results of this study provide insight into the impact of exercise on pro- and anti-angiogenic miRNA expression in PMVs. Subsequent studies in which specific miRNA are mimicked and inhibited will help uncover the functional implication of these miRNA on endothelial cells in health and disease.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

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Deciphering the Angiogenic MicroRNA Profile of Platelet-Derived Microvesicles

Microvesicles (MV) are small spherical bodies released by various cell types, including platelets. Recent studies suggest these 100 nm to 1 μm membrane bound bodies can act as transport vehicles, delivering molecules, such as proteins, mRNA, and microRNA, to other cells. Platelet-derived MVs (PMVs) have been shown to transfer these molecules to endothelial cells (cells lining blood vessels), which may induce physiological effects. MicroRNA (miRNA), a type of non-coding RNA, acts as a post-translational regulator of protein expression and ultimately orchestrates many functions within cells. We speculate that if PMVs deliver miRNA to endothelial cells this may impact processes that lead to angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels. The aim of the present study was to investigate pro- and anti-angiogenic miRNA from PMVs obtained before and after high intensity exercise. Ten participants were recruited and performed high intensity exercise for 45 minutes and blood samples were collected. After isolation of MVs through serial centrifugation, the miRNA was isolated and reversed transcribed into complementary DNA (cDNA). The cDNA was amplified using real-time PCR, and Ct values were determined for 2 pro- and 2 anti-angiogenic miRNA. The Ct values were compared between pre- and post- exercise samples to determine whether exercise influences angiogenic miRNA expression. The results of this study provide insight into the impact of exercise on pro- and anti-angiogenic miRNA expression in PMVs. Subsequent studies in which specific miRNA are mimicked and inhibited will help uncover the functional implication of these miRNA on endothelial cells in health and disease.