Presentation Title

Antibiotic Resistance in Soil Fertilized Using Biosolids

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Antibiotic resistance has become a major issue in the medical field, and appropriate management of potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes and organisms are important to reduce their spread. A concern when using biosolids from human waste as a fertilizer is the possibility of concentrating and spreading these antibiotic resistance genes in the environment.

In this experiment, qPCR was used to screen for 15 different antibiotic resistance genes to determine the difference in antibiotic resistance gene content for soil samples with and without biosolids (0 Mg/ha, 100 Mg/ha or 250 Mg/ha). Following qPCR, the amplification of antibiotic resistant genes was confirmed using gel electrophoresis. In all samples, the antibiotic resistance gene content was below the limit of detection for the assay conditions. These findings suggest that copies of antibiotic resistance genes are negligible in soils with and without biosolids additions from 0.09ng to 4.8ng of total community DNA. These findings are, however, inconclusive in showing whether differences between these treatments exist at higher resolution. This work provides foundational information for future surveys of antibiotic resistance genes in soils treated with biosolid.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Jonathan Van Hamme

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Antibiotic Resistance in Soil Fertilized Using Biosolids

Antibiotic resistance has become a major issue in the medical field, and appropriate management of potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes and organisms are important to reduce their spread. A concern when using biosolids from human waste as a fertilizer is the possibility of concentrating and spreading these antibiotic resistance genes in the environment.

In this experiment, qPCR was used to screen for 15 different antibiotic resistance genes to determine the difference in antibiotic resistance gene content for soil samples with and without biosolids (0 Mg/ha, 100 Mg/ha or 250 Mg/ha). Following qPCR, the amplification of antibiotic resistant genes was confirmed using gel electrophoresis. In all samples, the antibiotic resistance gene content was below the limit of detection for the assay conditions. These findings suggest that copies of antibiotic resistance genes are negligible in soils with and without biosolids additions from 0.09ng to 4.8ng of total community DNA. These findings are, however, inconclusive in showing whether differences between these treatments exist at higher resolution. This work provides foundational information for future surveys of antibiotic resistance genes in soils treated with biosolid.