Presentation Title

The Effects of High-Intensity Exercise on the Proteome of Platelet-Derived Microvesicles

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Microvesicles are small, heterogeneous lipid bilayer enclosed vesicles that can range from 100 – 1000nm in diameter. Those derived from platelets (PMVs) are of the highest abundance in the circulatory system at approximately 80% of the total population. PMVs are constitutively expressed and involved in normal physiological processes like angiogenesis and coagulation; conversely, they are found to be elevated in certain diseased states. To explain their multifaceted effects, PMVs contain many different important bioactive compounds -- for example, proteins that can mediate angiogenesis by interacting with the cells that line the lumen of blood vessels (endothelial cells). Interestingly, exercise increases PMV concentrations in systemic circulation as well as initiating angiogenesis.

The aim of this study was to identify and quantify PMVs that have differentially regulated proteins due to high-intensity exercise. For this study, 10 healthy participants completed an initial maximal exercise test, returning on a separate day to exercise for 45 minutes at 60% of their peak power output. Blood samples were collected before and after the exercise trial, centrifuged to isolate platelet free plasma, then subsequently exposed to protein organic solvent precipitation (PROSPR), purifying PMVs from typical plasma proteins like albumin. After isolation, the PMVs were lysed, protein yield was determined, and the intravesicular extract was assessed by separating and resolving the individual protein fragments using 2D SDS-PAGE. The gels were then imaged and differing protein spots were excised from the gel and identified by MS/MS. Flow cytometry was also used to enumerate the amount of CD41+ PMVs in the before and after exercise samples. The data collected will help determine if high-intensity exercise facilitates angiogenesis through certain proteins within PMVs.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Effects of High-Intensity Exercise on the Proteome of Platelet-Derived Microvesicles

Microvesicles are small, heterogeneous lipid bilayer enclosed vesicles that can range from 100 – 1000nm in diameter. Those derived from platelets (PMVs) are of the highest abundance in the circulatory system at approximately 80% of the total population. PMVs are constitutively expressed and involved in normal physiological processes like angiogenesis and coagulation; conversely, they are found to be elevated in certain diseased states. To explain their multifaceted effects, PMVs contain many different important bioactive compounds -- for example, proteins that can mediate angiogenesis by interacting with the cells that line the lumen of blood vessels (endothelial cells). Interestingly, exercise increases PMV concentrations in systemic circulation as well as initiating angiogenesis.

The aim of this study was to identify and quantify PMVs that have differentially regulated proteins due to high-intensity exercise. For this study, 10 healthy participants completed an initial maximal exercise test, returning on a separate day to exercise for 45 minutes at 60% of their peak power output. Blood samples were collected before and after the exercise trial, centrifuged to isolate platelet free plasma, then subsequently exposed to protein organic solvent precipitation (PROSPR), purifying PMVs from typical plasma proteins like albumin. After isolation, the PMVs were lysed, protein yield was determined, and the intravesicular extract was assessed by separating and resolving the individual protein fragments using 2D SDS-PAGE. The gels were then imaged and differing protein spots were excised from the gel and identified by MS/MS. Flow cytometry was also used to enumerate the amount of CD41+ PMVs in the before and after exercise samples. The data collected will help determine if high-intensity exercise facilitates angiogenesis through certain proteins within PMVs.